Monthly Archives: July 2014

St. Paul’s Anglican Cathedral | Valletta, Malta | 31 July 2014

At the end of Archbishop Street in Valletta is St. Paul’s Anglican Cathedral. It was built between 1839 and 1844 and funded by the Dowager Queen Adelaide widow of King William IV.

During her visit in 1838-39 she discovered that there was not an Anglican church in Malta and ordered one to be built. The cathedral was finally built on the site where the Auberge d’Allemagne, home to the German knights, used to stand but was knocked down to make way for the new cathedral. The cathedral was dedicated to St. Paul and has a huge steeple of 65m (210ft) which stands out marking the capital’s skyline.

Next to the cathedral is the Carmelite Dome in which the original had to be replaced in 1958 when the dome was bombed during World War II.

Information from:
Web: http://www.visitmalta.com/en/info/stpaulsanglicancathedral

© Tony Blood - St. Paul's Anglican Cathedral. Valletta Malta, 31 July 2014

© Tony Blood – St. Paul’s Anglican Cathedral. Valletta Malta, 31 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Carmelite Church. Valletta Malta, 31 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Carmelite Church. Valletta Malta, 31 July 2014

Senglea, Malta | 30 July 2014

This small city, one of the so-called Three Cities, stands on a narrow promontory jutting into Grand Harbour.

The land was fortified in 1551 by Grand Master Claude de la Sengle. The Maltese often use the area’s earlier name, L-Isla, meaning the island or perhaps short for `peninsula’. During the Great Siege of 1565, Senglea was protected by Fort St. Michael on its landward side and by Fort St. Angelo on the tip of Vittoriosa across the creek. The heroic role played by its people led Grand Master Jean de la Valette to give the city the title of Citta’ Invicta, the invincible city. Like its sister cities, Senglea suffered heavy damage during World War II. More than 75 percent of its buildings were destroyed. The parish church dedicated to the Nativity of the Madonna was rebuilt and retains its artistic heritage.

The city is noted for its superb harbour views across to Valletta from Safe Haven Gardens at Senglea Point. The stone vedette, known as Il-Gardjola, on the bastion-point served as a look-out post to guard the harbour entrance. The sculptured eye and ear above its windows are symbols of vigilance.

Information from:
Web: http://www.visitmalta.com/en/info/senglea

© Tony Blood - View of Birgu. Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood – View of Birgu. Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Senglea Harbour, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Senglea Harbour, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Steps. Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Steps. Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Triq il-Vitorja. Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Triq il-Vitorja. Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Door Knob. Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Door Knob. Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Point Sally Port, Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Point Sally Port, Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Point Sally Port, Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Point Sally Port, Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

Gardjola Gardens | Senglea, Malta | 30 July 2014

Constructed on a grid pattern in 1551 by order of Grandmaster De La Sengle, the Gardjola Gardens in Senglea offer a panoramic view that includes the docks in Marsa, Valletta, the entrance to the Grand Harbour and Fort St. Angelo.

The sentry box placed on the tip of the bastion, ‘il-gardjola’, epitomises the role of the fortifications around the harbour. On the sentry box there are sculptured various symbols of watchfulness, namely the eye, the ear, and the crane bird. The inscription in Latin assures the inhabitants of the harbour area to rest at ease, as the tower stands guard against any hostile force that may attempt to approach Maltese shores.

Information from:
Web: http://www.visitmalta.com/en/info/gardjolagardens

© Tony Blood - Watchtower. Gardjola Gardens. Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Watchtower. Gardjola Gardens. Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Water Feature. Gardjola Gardens. Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Water Feature. Gardjola Gardens. Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Watchtower. Gardjola Gardens. Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Watchtower. Gardjola Gardens. Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Water Feature. Gardjola Gardens. Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Water Feature. Gardjola Gardens. Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood - View of Valletta. Gardjola Gardens. Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood – View of Valletta. Gardjola Gardens. Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Eye. Gardjola Gardens. Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Eye. Gardjola Gardens. Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Ear. Gardjola Gardens. Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Ear. Gardjola Gardens. Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Gardjola Gardens. Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Gardjola Gardens. Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

Love Monument | Spinola Bay, St. Julian’s, Malta | 29 July 2014

This modern structure constructed out of Travertine was built with the intention that the word “LOVE” would be reflected in the calm waters of Spinola bay.

Information from:
Web: http://www.malta.com/en/about-malta/city-village/st-julian-s

St. Julian’s is now a major residential and tourist centre, and home to some of Malta’s newest hotels. It is now an extension of Sliema although it started life as a small fishing port based on Spinola and Balluta Bays. St. Julian’s merges with Paceville, Malta’s main nightlife centre where there are clubs, casinos and numerous restaurants, cafes and bars. Picturesque Spinola Bay is still used by fishermen whose traditional boats are housed just below the restaurants. The bay is particularly attractive at night and as a venue for open-air dining. The elegant Spinola Palace, built in 1658 by an Italian knight, Giovanni Spinola, is the landmark historic building on the bay. Another fine building with superb sea views is Villa Dragonara, now a casino, on the headland of St. George’s Bay.

Information from:
Web: http://www.visitmalta.com/en/info/stjulians

© Tony Blood - Love Monument. Spinola Bay, St. Julian's, Malta, 29 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Love Monument. Spinola Bay, St. Julian’s, Malta, 29 July 2014

Portomaso Business Tower | St. Julian’s, Malta | 29 July 2014

The Portomaso Business Tower (the Tower) is the tallest building in Malta. The Tower stands in the Portomaso section of St. Julian’s, a town just north of Malta’s capital city, Valletta. Opened in 2001, the Tower is 98 metres (322 ft) tall, with 23 floors of mixed commercial office space.

The first six floors of the Tower have 465 square metres (5,010 sq ft) of floor space, while the remaining floors have 295 m2 (3,180 sq ft) each. The main floor is occupied by a shopping centre while the top floor of the building is a nightclub with balconies affording views of the island nation.

Information from:
From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portomaso_Business_Tower

© Tony Blood - Portomaso Business Tower. St. Julian's, Malta, 29 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Portomaso Business Tower. St. Julian’s, Malta, 29 July 2014

Dragonara Casino | Dragonara Palace, St. Julian’s, Malta | 29 July 2014

Built in 1870 as the summer residence of the Marquis Scicluna the Dragonara Palace opened as Malta’s first Casino in 1964. The Dragonara Casino was one of the first major projects to establish Malta as a prime tourist destination.

Now in its 50th year of operation, the Dragonara Casino is managed by Dragonara Gaming Limited; the leading land based gaming operator in Malta. Since taking over the Dragonara Casino in July 2010, Dragonara Gaming Limited has invested more than €15 million to transform and restore the Casino into one of the most prestigious Gaming properties in the Mediterranean. Approximately 350,000 patrons visit the Casino each year making the Dragonara the foremost Casino in Malta.

Dragonara Gaming Limited has grand plans for the Casino as it continues to invest in the property with the aim of creating the most prestigious and established Gaming Venues in Europe. The company is undertaking a multi-million euro investment to convert the building at the northern tip of the Dragonara Peninsula into a multi-purpose Entertainment and Gaming venue like no other in Southern Europe. The new venue to be inaugurated in the fourth quarter of 2014 will include a Poker Venue equipped to host the most significant Global International Poker tournaments, Private Gaming for high-rollers and an Entertainment spot including a beach club during to be used in the summer months.

Information from:
Web: http://thepalace.dragonaracasino.com/index.php/the-casino/palace-history/

© Tony Blood - Dragonara Casino, St. Julian's, Malta, 29 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Dragonara Casino, St. Julian’s, Malta, 29 July 2014

Mdina | Rabat, Malta | 24 July 2014

Mdina is Malta’s old capital city, with Rabat being its suburb. A Bronze Age village is believed to have once stood at one end of the hill where Mdina today lies. The area was subsequently occupied by the Phoenicians, the Carthaginians, and the Romans and became an important urban centre. Melita, as the city was known during Roman times, was at least three times the size of the present-day Mdina. (Zammit, p.85)

Information from:
Zammit, Vincent, 2011. Malta History & Tradition. BDL Publishing.

© Tony Blood - Mdina, Rabat, Malta, 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Mdina, Rabat, Malta, 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Mdina, Rabat, Malta, 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Mdina, Rabat, Malta, 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Mdina, Rabat, Malta, 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Mdina, Rabat, Malta, 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Mdina, Rabat, Malta, 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Mdina, Rabat, Malta, 24 July 2014

WWII Shelters | Wignacourt Museum | Rabat, Malta | 24 July 2014

The building, fully completed in 1749, is on three levels: the underground level consists of a labyrinth of Punic, Roman and Christian Hypogea with interesting architectural features as well as a complex of World War II shelters with two main corridors and fifty rooms.

Information from:
Web: http://www.wignacourtmuseum.com

© Tony Blood – WWII Shelters, Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – WWII Shelters, Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – WWII Shelters, Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – WWII Shelters, Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – WWII Shelters, Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – WWII Shelters, Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – WWII Shelters, Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – WWII Shelters, Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

Wignacourt Museum | Rabat, Malta | 24 July 2014

The main floor has an impressive picture gallery with works by Mattia Preti, Antoine Favray, Francesco Zahra and other Maltese as well as European Artists. Also a collection of 17th- 19th century Spanish, Italian and Maltese silver; a unique wooden altar used for the celebration of Mass on the galleys of the Order of the Knights of Malta; a collection of old relics and reliquaries, sculptures in wood, alabaster and bronze, including a medallion by Alessandro Algardi; maps, coins, prints and rare books among which is King Henry VIII’s ‘Septem Sacramants” written to confute Martin Luther and above all a baroque chapel for the private devotions of the residing chaplains.

Information from:
Web: http://www.wignacourtmuseum.com

© Tony Blood - Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Chapel, Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Chapel, Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Portrait of Pope Alexander VII (Formerly Fabio Chigi Inquisitor of Malta). Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Portrait of Pope Alexander VII (Formerly Fabio Chigi
Inquisitor of Malta). Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

St. Paul’s Grotto | Wignacourt Museum | Rabat, Malta | 24 July 2014

The Wignacourt Collegiate Museum at Rabat Malta has been reopened after a thorough refurbishment of the whole building – a baroque residence of the Chaplains of the Knights of Malta inaugurated by Grand Master Aloph de Wignacourt (1601-1622) as well as of its contents.

St Paul’s Grotto, the cradle of Christianity in Malta, the place where St Paul the Apostle in A.D. 60 is believed to have founded the first Christian Community on the island.

Information from:
Web: http://www.wignacourtmuseum.com

St. Paul's Grotto. Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta, 24 July 2014

St. Paul’s Grotto. Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta, 24 July 2014

Catacombs | Wignacourt Museum | Rabat, Malta | 24 July 2014

The Wignacourt Collegiate Museum at Rabat Malta has been reopened after a thorough refurbishment of the whole building – a baroque residence of the Chaplains of the Knights of Malta inaugurated by Grand Master Aloph de Wignacourt (1601-1622) as well as of its contents.

The building, fully completed in 1749, is on three levels: the underground level consists of a labyrinth of Punic, Roman and Christian Hypogea with interesting architectural features as well as a complex of World War II shelters with two main corridors and fifty rooms.

Information from:
Web: http://www.wignacourtmuseum.com

© Tony Blood - Catacombs, Wignacoourt Museum, Rabat, Malta, 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Catacombs, Wignacoourt Museum, Rabat, Malta, 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Catacombs, Wignacoourt Museum, Rabat, Malta, 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Catacombs, Wignacoourt Museum, Rabat, Malta, 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Catacombs, Wignacoourt Museum, Rabat, Malta, 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Catacombs, Wignacoourt Museum, Rabat, Malta, 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Catacombs, Wignacoourt Museum, Rabat, Malta, 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Catacombs, Wignacoourt Museum, Rabat, Malta, 24 July 2014

Marsaxlokk Parish Church | Masaxlokk, Malta | 23 July 2014

The Parish Church in the summer resort of Marsaxlokk was built in 1897 and is dedicated to our Lady of Pompei. The parish in Marsaxlokk is today the venue of a national pilgrimage every year on the 8th May.

Information from:
Web: http://www.malta.com/en/local-information/parish-church/marsaxlokk

© Tony Blood - Marsaxlokk Parish Church. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 23 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Marsaxlokk Parish Church. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 23 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Marsaxlokk Parish Church. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 23 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Marsaxlokk Parish Church. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 23 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Marsaxlokk Parish Church. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 23 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Marsaxlokk Parish Church. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 23 July 2014

Marsaxlokk, Malta | 23 July 2014

Marsaxlokk Bay is Malta’s second largest natural harbour. It is the best place to see the colourful, traditional Maltese fishing boats, the Luzzus, with the mythical eye painted on their prows.

The village is the Islands’ main fishing harbour; its Sunday fish market a fascinating insight into local life and a traditional industry. The stalls brim with the night’s catch – fish of all shapes, colours and sizes. The village itself has many good fish restaurants. Marsaxlokk derives its name from the Arabic word marsa, meaning harbour, and Maltese for the south-easterly Mediterranean wind, the Xlokk (Sirocco in Italian). Marsaxlokk, with its sheltered habour, was an easy landing place for pirates and the Ottoman Turks. It was here that the Ottoman Turks landed for an attack which ended in the Great Siege of 1565. Napoleon’s army landed here in 1798; and in recent times, the harbour was the scene of the Bush-Gorbachev Summit,1989.

The headland to the left of the Bay is Delimara Point. It has two attractive, secluded rocky inlets suitable for swimming: Peter’s Pool; and the furthermost part of the headland. Fort Delimara, on the west of the peninsula, was built by the British in 1881 to guard the entrance to Marsaxlokk Bay.

Information from:
Web: http://www.visitmalta.com/en/info/marsaxlokk

© Tony Blood - Boy Fishing. Marsaxlokk Harbour. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 23 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Boy Fishing. Marsaxlokk Harbour. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 23 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Marsaxlokk Harbour. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 23 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Marsaxlokk Harbour. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 23 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Marsaxlokk Harbour. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 23 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Marsaxlokk Harbour. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 23 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Love Malta. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 23 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Love Malta. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 23 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Red Chair. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 23 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Red Chair. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 23 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Marsaxlokk Harbour. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 23 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Marsaxlokk Harbour. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 23 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Marsaxlokk Harbour. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 23 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Marsaxlokk Harbour. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 23 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Marsaxlokk Harbour. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 23 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Marsaxlokk Harbour. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 23 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Marsaxlokk Harbour. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 23 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Marsaxlokk Harbour. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 23 July 2014