Tag Archives: Cathedral

St. John’s Co-Cathedral | Valletta, Malta | 16 September 2014

St John’s Co-Cathedral is a gem of Baroque art and architecture. It was built as the conventual church for the Knights of St. John. The Grand Masters and several knights donated gifts of high artistic value and made enormous contributions to enrich it with only the best works of art. This church is till this very day an important shrine and a sacred place of worship. It is also a venue for cultural events.

Information from:
Web: http://stjohnscocathedral.com

Described as the first complete example of the high Baroque anywhere, St. John’s Cathedral epitomises the role of its original patrons, the Knights of St. John. The Cathedral is testimony to the talent of Maltese military architect Gerolamo Cassar, with Mattia Preti’s intricately carved stone wall designs, as well as the painted vaulted ceiling and side altars with scenes from the life of St. John. The Cathedral also houses one of Europe’s most impressive and famous art works – Caravaggio’s Beheading of St. John the Baptist. The Cathedral was a shrine to the Knights, as many sons of Europe’s noble families from the 16th to 18th centuries lie buried here. Their intricate, marble-inlaid tombstones form a magnificently crafted pavimento. Also a resting place to the founder of Valletta, Grand Master Jean Parisot de la Vallette, his tomb lies in the crypt, a quiet sanctuary and place of contemplation away from the busy streets outside.

Information from:
Web: http://www.visitmalta.com/en/info/stjohnscocathedralmuseum

© Tony Blood - Caravaggio's St. Jerome Writing, St. John's Co-Cathedral. Valletta Malta, 16 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Caravaggio’s St. Jerome Writing, St. John’s Co-Cathedral. Valletta Malta, 16 July 2014

© Tony Blood - St. John's Co-Cathedral. Valletta Malta, 16 July 2014

© Tony Blood – St. John’s Co-Cathedral. Valletta Malta, 16 July 2014

© Tony Blood - St. John's Co-Cathedral. Valletta Malta, 16 July 2014

© Tony Blood – St. John’s Co-Cathedral. Valletta Malta, 16 July 2014

© Tony Blood - St. John's Co-Cathedral. Valletta Malta, 16 July 2014

© Tony Blood – St. John’s Co-Cathedral. Valletta Malta, 16 July 2014

© Tony Blood - St. John's Co-Cathedral. Valletta Malta, 16 July 2014

© Tony Blood – St. John’s Co-Cathedral. Valletta Malta, 16 July 2014

© Tony Blood - St. John's Co-Cathedral. Valletta Malta, 16 July 2014

© Tony Blood – St. John’s Co-Cathedral. Valletta Malta, 16 July 2014

© Tony Blood - St. John's Co-Cathedral. Valletta Malta, 16 July 2014

© Tony Blood – St. John’s Co-Cathedral. Valletta Malta, 16 July 2014

© Tony Blood - St. John's Co-Cathedral. Valletta Malta, 16 July 2014

© Tony Blood – St. John’s Co-Cathedral. Valletta Malta, 16 July 2014

© Tony Blood - St. John's Co-Cathedral. Valletta Malta, 16 July 2014

© Tony Blood – St. John’s Co-Cathedral. Valletta Malta, 16 July 2014

Mellieħa Bay | Mellieħa, Malta | 4 September 2014

Mellieħa Bay is the largest beach of thirteen pocket beaches around Mellieħa. It is a sheltered beach between two headlands and is situated on the Northern part of the Island.

Its sand has a low gradient slope and together with its clear, shallow water makes it the most popular family beach on the island. Mellieħa Bay has most facilities and services including restaurants and two hotels. Some parts of the bay are designated for water sports and wind surfing. Beach management is operated between June and September by the Malta Tourism Authority with the cooperation of Mellieħa Local Council. It includes the services of lifeguards, a small First Aid clinic, two beach supervisors and a number of persons in charge of beach maintenance. It is an accessible beach furnished with a mobile toilet, wheelchair access and special sand wheelchair buggies for physically impaired bathers. In 2011 the beach was awarded a Beach of Quality Award. Mellieħa Bay has an old castle perched on one side while the old village of Mellieħa is situated high on the opposite side. The hinterland of Mellieħa Bay was once an important salt flat and wetland, known as L-Għadira. It is now a Nature Reserve that boasts of indigenous flora and fauna, and is popular with bird watchers who study local and migratory birds. Mellieħa Bay is also referred to as L-Għadira.

Information from:
Web: http://www.visitmalta.com/en/info/melliehabay

© Tony Blood - Mellieħa Bay, Mellieħa, Malta, 4 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Mellieħa Bay, Mellieħa, Malta, 4 September 2014

Parish Church of Mellieħa | Mellieħa, Malta | 1 September 2014

The Parish Church of Mellieha is dedicated to the Birth of Our Lady, and was built between 1881 and 1898. All the stone was cut from a nearby quarry at l-Ahrax tal-Mellieha and transported up to Mellieha by the local peasants, who worked laboriously to see their wish of having a new church come true. Once the church’s building was completed, the Parish Priests Dun Frangisk Magri, Dun Carlo Cortis and Dun Indri Fenech endeavoured to embellish the interior. 

Thus between 1920 and 1940 the belfries and dome were erected, five bellsdedicated to St. Frances, St. Joseph, St. Anthony, St. Paul and the Virgin Marywere brought from Milan, and the church altars were decorated with paintings by the best Maltese artists, including the renowned Giuseppe Calì and Lazzru Pisani.

Information from:
Web: http://www.mellieha.com/parish_church.htm

© Tony Blood - Parish Church of Mellieħa. Mellieħa, Malta, 1 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Parish Church of Mellieħa. Mellieħa, Malta, 1 September 2014

The Feast of Our Lady Star of the Sea | Paris Church of Stella Maris | Sliema, Malta | 24 August 2014

The Feast of Our Lady Star of the Sea is celebrated in the town of Sliema in Malta.

© Tony Blood - The Feast of Our Lady Star of the Sea. Paris Church of Stella Maris, Sliema, Malta, 24 August 2014

© Tony Blood – The Feast of Our Lady Star of the Sea. Paris Church of Stella Maris, Sliema, Malta, 24 August 2014

© Tony Blood - The Feast of Our Lady Star of the Sea. Paris Church of Stella Maris, Sliema, Malta, 24 August 2014

© Tony Blood – The Feast of Our Lady Star of the Sea. Paris Church of Stella Maris, Sliema, Malta, 24 August 2014

© Tony Blood - The Feast of Our Lady Star of the Sea. Paris Church of Stella Maris, Sliema, Malta, 24 August 2014

© Tony Blood – The Feast of Our Lady Star of the Sea. Paris Church of Stella Maris, Sliema, Malta, 24 August 2014

© Tony Blood - The Feast of Our Lady Star of the Sea. Paris Church of Stella Maris, Sliema, Malta, 24 August 2014

© Tony Blood – The Feast of Our Lady Star of the Sea. Paris Church of Stella Maris, Sliema, Malta, 24 August 2014

© Tony Blood - The Feast of Our Lady Star of the Sea. Paris Church of Stella Maris, Sliema, Malta, 24 August 2014

© Tony Blood – The Feast of Our Lady Star of the Sea. Paris Church of Stella Maris, Sliema, Malta, 24 August 2014

© Tony Blood - The Feast of Our Lady Star of the Sea. Paris Church of Stella Maris, Sliema, Malta, 24 August 2014

© Tony Blood – The Feast of Our Lady Star of the Sea. Paris Church of Stella Maris, Sliema, Malta, 24 August 2014

© Tony Blood - The Feast of Our Lady Star of the Sea. Paris Church of Stella Maris, Sliema, Malta, 24 August 2014

© Tony Blood – The Feast of Our Lady Star of the Sea. Paris Church of Stella Maris, Sliema, Malta, 24 August 2014

© Tony Blood - The Feast of Our Lady Star of the Sea. Paris Church of Stella Maris, Sliema, Malta, 24 August 2014

© Tony Blood – The Feast of Our Lady Star of the Sea. Paris Church of Stella Maris, Sliema, Malta, 24 August 2014

© Tony Blood - The Feast of Our Lady Star of the Sea. Paris Church of Stella Maris, Sliema, Malta, 24 August 2014

© Tony Blood – The Feast of Our Lady Star of the Sea. Paris Church of Stella Maris, Sliema, Malta, 24 August 2014

© Tony Blood - The Feast of Our Lady Star of the Sea. Paris Church of Stella Maris, Sliema, Malta, 24 August 2014

© Tony Blood – The Feast of Our Lady Star of the Sea. Paris Church of Stella Maris, Sliema, Malta, 24 August 2014

© Tony Blood - The Feast of Our Lady Star of the Sea. Paris Church of Stella Maris, Sliema, Malta, 24 August 2014

© Tony Blood – The Feast of Our Lady Star of the Sea. Paris Church of Stella Maris, Sliema, Malta, 24 August 2014

© Tony Blood - The Feast of Our Lady Star of the Sea. Paris Church of Stella Maris, Sliema, Malta, 24 August 2014

© Tony Blood – The Feast of Our Lady Star of the Sea. Paris Church of Stella Maris, Sliema, Malta, 24 August 2014

© Tony Blood - The Feast of Our Lady Star of the Sea. Paris Church of Stella Maris, Sliema, Malta, 24 August 2014

© Tony Blood – The Feast of Our Lady Star of the Sea. Paris Church of Stella Maris, Sliema, Malta, 24 August 2014

St. Paul’s Cathedral | Mdina, Rabat, Malta | 19 August 2014

The Cathedral also know as St. Paul’s Cathedral is the architectural crown of the elegant, walled city of Mdina. A late 17th century masterpiece of Maltese architect Lorenzo Gafà, it lies on the site of a much earlier Norman church that was destroyed by the violent earthquake of 1693.

According to tradition, the earlier church had been built on the site of the house of Publius, the Roman’s chief man on the Islands, who was converted to Christianity by St. Paul in A.D. 60. The Cathedral’s imposing facade greets you abruptly as you emerge from Mdina’s narrow streets. The building is topped by a magnificent dome, possibly one of Gafà’s greatest achievements. the dome has though had a chequered history: a succession of painters have tried to embellish its interior.

Today’s dome interior dates from the 1950s. In the Mdina cathedral, you find works by the Calabrian artist and Knight, Mattia Preti. The pavement of marble-inlaid tombstones carries the coats of arms and inscriptions of the bishops of Mdina and other members of the Cathedral chapter. In the choir behind the main altar is Preti’s monumental depiction of The Conversion of St. Paul. It was part of the original Norman church, and survived the earthquake.

Information from:
Web: http://www.visitmalta.com/en/info/mdinacathedral

© Tony Blood - St. Paul's Cathedral. Mdina, Rabat, Malta, 19 August 2014

© Tony Blood – St. Paul’s Cathedral. Mdina, Rabat, Malta, 19 August 2014

Birżebbuġa Parish Church | Birżebbuġa, Malta | 17 August 2014

Birżebbuġa became a parish on the 9th September 1913, and the small church of Our Lady of Sorrows became the parish church; steps were immediately taken in hand to build a larger church which was opened for worship on the 16th June 1938.

Information from:
Web: http://thechurchinmalta.org/en/posts/209/birzebbuga

© Tony Blood - Birżebbuġa Parish Church. Birżebbuġa, Malta, 17 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Birżebbuġa Parish Church. Birżebbuġa, Malta, 17 August 2014

Mosta Dome | Mosta, Malta | 5 August 2014

Built in 1860 over another church that was built in 1614, the church of St. Mary is the Parish church of Mosta. The interior of the church is quite impressive with its circular shape and clear interior.

The awesome dome is the fourth largest in the world and famous due to the incident that took place during WWII – a bomb, which pierced the dome in 1942 landed on the church floor and slid across the floor without exploding! The church was crowded when the bomb hit and all were spared. The bomb is now on display in a small museum attached to the church.

Mosta’s titular feast – that of St. Mary or the Assumption of Our Lady – held on August 15th is a high point in the local religious celebrations. The people of Mosta rally in front of the Rotunda in a manifestation of joy, merrymaking and social wellbeing.

Information from:
Web: http://www.visitmalta.com/en/info/mostadome

© Tony Blood - Mosta Dome. Mosta, Malta, 5 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Mosta Dome. Mosta, Malta, 5 August 2014

© Tony Blood - Mosta Dome. Mosta, Malta, 5 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Mosta Dome. Mosta, Malta, 5 August 2014

© Tony Blood - St. Andrew. Mosta Dome. Mosta, Malta, 5 August 2014

© Tony Blood – St. Andrew. Mosta Dome. Mosta, Malta, 5 August 2014

© Tony Blood - St. Jacob. Mosta Dome. Mosta, Malta, 5 August 2014

© Tony Blood – St. Jacob. Mosta Dome. Mosta, Malta, 5 August 2014

© Tony Blood - St. Bartholomew. Mosta Dome. Mosta, Malta, 5 August 2014

© Tony Blood – St. Bartholomew. Mosta Dome. Mosta, Malta, 5 August 2014

© Tony Blood - St. Peter. Mosta Dome. Mosta, Malta, 5 August 2014

© Tony Blood – St. Peter. Mosta Dome. Mosta, Malta, 5 August 2014

© Tony Blood - St. Jacob. Mosta Dome. Mosta, Malta, 5 August 2014

© Tony Blood – St. Jacob. Mosta Dome. Mosta, Malta, 5 August 2014

© Tony Blood - St. Phillip. Mosta Dome. Mosta, Malta, 5 August 2014

© Tony Blood – St. Phillip. Mosta Dome. Mosta, Malta, 5 August 2014

© Tony Blood - St. Thomas. Mosta Dome. Mosta, Malta, 5 August 2014

© Tony Blood – St. Thomas. Mosta Dome. Mosta, Malta, 5 August 2014

© Tony Blood - St. Mathew. Mosta Dome. Mosta, Malta, 5 August 2014

© Tony Blood – St. Mathew. Mosta Dome. Mosta, Malta, 5 August 2014

© Tony Blood - St. Paul. Mosta Dome. Mosta, Malta, 5 August 2014

© Tony Blood – St. Paul. Mosta Dome. Mosta, Malta, 5 August 2014

© Tony Blood - Mosta Dome. Mosta, Malta, 5 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Mosta Dome. Mosta, Malta, 5 August 2014

© Tony Blood - Mosta Dome. Mosta, Malta, 5 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Mosta Dome. Mosta, Malta, 5 August 2014

© Tony Blood - Mosta Dome. Mosta, Malta, 5 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Mosta Dome. Mosta, Malta, 5 August 2014

© Tony Blood - Mosta Dome. Mosta, Malta, 5 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Mosta Dome. Mosta, Malta, 5 August 2014

© Tony Blood - Mosta Dome. Mosta, Malta, 5 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Mosta Dome. Mosta, Malta, 5 August 2014

© Tony Blood - Mosta Dome. Mosta, Malta, 5 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Mosta Dome. Mosta, Malta, 5 August 2014

© Tony Blood - Mosta Dome. Mosta, Malta, 5 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Mosta Dome. Mosta, Malta, 5 August 2014

© Tony Blood - Mosta Dome. Mosta, Malta, 5 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Mosta Dome. Mosta, Malta, 5 August 2014

© Tony Blood - Unexploded Bomb. Mosta Dome. Mosta, Malta, 5 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Unexploded Bomb. Mosta Dome. Mosta, Malta, 5 August 2014

St. Paul’s Anglican Cathedral | Valletta, Malta | 31 July 2014

At the end of Archbishop Street in Valletta is St. Paul’s Anglican Cathedral. It was built between 1839 and 1844 and funded by the Dowager Queen Adelaide widow of King William IV.

During her visit in 1838-39 she discovered that there was not an Anglican church in Malta and ordered one to be built. The cathedral was finally built on the site where the Auberge d’Allemagne, home to the German knights, used to stand but was knocked down to make way for the new cathedral. The cathedral was dedicated to St. Paul and has a huge steeple of 65m (210ft) which stands out marking the capital’s skyline.

Next to the cathedral is the Carmelite Dome in which the original had to be replaced in 1958 when the dome was bombed during World War II.

Information from:
Web: http://www.visitmalta.com/en/info/stpaulsanglicancathedral

© Tony Blood - St. Paul's Anglican Cathedral. Valletta Malta, 31 July 2014

© Tony Blood – St. Paul’s Anglican Cathedral. Valletta Malta, 31 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Carmelite Church. Valletta Malta, 31 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Carmelite Church. Valletta Malta, 31 July 2014

Senglea, Malta | 30 July 2014

This small city, one of the so-called Three Cities, stands on a narrow promontory jutting into Grand Harbour.

The land was fortified in 1551 by Grand Master Claude de la Sengle. The Maltese often use the area’s earlier name, L-Isla, meaning the island or perhaps short for `peninsula’. During the Great Siege of 1565, Senglea was protected by Fort St. Michael on its landward side and by Fort St. Angelo on the tip of Vittoriosa across the creek. The heroic role played by its people led Grand Master Jean de la Valette to give the city the title of Citta’ Invicta, the invincible city. Like its sister cities, Senglea suffered heavy damage during World War II. More than 75 percent of its buildings were destroyed. The parish church dedicated to the Nativity of the Madonna was rebuilt and retains its artistic heritage.

The city is noted for its superb harbour views across to Valletta from Safe Haven Gardens at Senglea Point. The stone vedette, known as Il-Gardjola, on the bastion-point served as a look-out post to guard the harbour entrance. The sculptured eye and ear above its windows are symbols of vigilance.

Information from:
Web: http://www.visitmalta.com/en/info/senglea

© Tony Blood - View of Birgu. Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood – View of Birgu. Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Senglea Harbour, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Senglea Harbour, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Steps. Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Steps. Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Triq il-Vitorja. Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Triq il-Vitorja. Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Door Knob. Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Door Knob. Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Point Sally Port, Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Point Sally Port, Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Point Sally Port, Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Point Sally Port, Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014