Tag Archives: Digital

Büyükada, Turkey | 21 August 2015

Sheep huddle together in the middle of an off beaten pathway in Büyükada, Princes Islands, Turkey. The reason for their behaviour could be to cool off from the heat.

© Tony Blood - Büyükada, Princes' Islands, Turkey. 21 August 2015

© Tony Blood – Büyükada, Princes’ Islands, Turkey. 21 August 2015

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Salt Pans | Bugibba, Malta | 2 October 2014

BUGIBBA SALT PANS Situated on the foreshore of the Bugibba area next to the pier, these salt pans have been known to be here for a very long time. Probably like other sites in the region, a fine layer of sand covered and preserved them in the state they are in, to the 21st Century. The site is a pride of bygone engineering skills, basing it’s unique function on the simple law of gravity. The water flow is directed to different pans, through rock-hewn gutters, and controlled by the use of sluice gates and stone shutters. In other parts, circular channels bring the water level to service other canals that otherwise would be excluded from the system. The workmanship is excellent, particularly when one compares the site to other salt pans around the island. Two large salt-water reservoirs linked the rest by a central canal system furnished the smaller pans with water. Previously there may have been as many as six such reservoirs, some of which have been buried under new development. From the reservoirs, the central channel runs to two different sluice gate systems that service a number of pans, six of them being a uniform square type. A complex circular system of water control connected three of the pans. This system making use of stone shutters and canals, would have served to bring up the water level to the desired level so as to service the other pans further along the system.

Information from: Rural Development for Malta 2007-2013 The European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development Government of Malta Europe Investing in Rural Areas

Bugibba Salt Pans, Malta, 2 October 2014

Bugibba Salt Pans, Malta, 2 October 2014

Bugibba Salt Pans, Malta, 2 October 2014

Bugibba Salt Pans, Malta, 2 October 2014

Bugibba Salt Pans, Malta, 2 October 2014

Bugibba Salt Pans, Malta, 2 October 2014

Bugibba Salt Pans, Malta, 2 October 2014

Bugibba Salt Pans, Malta, 2 October 2014

The National Museum of Archaeology | Valletta, Malta | 25 August 2014

The National Museum of Archaeology displays a significant array of artefacts from the Islands’ unique prehistoric periods, starting with the first arrival of man in 5200 BC, running up to 2500 BC. The first rooms trace man’s early settlement on the Islands up to the temple-building periods using a reconstruction of a rock-cut tomb. The collection includes obsidian cores and the Red Skorba figurines, which are predecessors of the temple period objects and statuary. The main hall is devoted to temple carvings and the collection continues with representations of animals, temple models, and the remarkable human figures. Of particular note are the exquisite figures of the ‘Sleeping Lady’ from the Hypogeum, and the ‘Venus’ of Hagar Qim. The last room exhibits some pottery from the temple period, together with tools, beads and other ornaments.

Information from:
Web: http://www.visitmalta.com/en/info/nationalmuseumofarchaeology

The National Museum of Archaeology is housed in the Auberge de Provence, in Republic Street, Valletta. The building, an example of fine Baroque architecture, was built in 1571 and followed a plan by local architect Ġilormu Cassar. The Auberge de Provence was house to the Knights of the Order of St John originating from Provence, France and displays beautiful architectural features. Of particular note is the Grand Salon, with its richly painted walls and wooden beamed ceiling. The Museum exhibits a spectacular range of artefacts dating back to Malta’s Neolithic period (5000 BC) up to the Phoenician Period (400 BC). On display are the earliest tools used by the prehistoric people to facilitate their daily tasks and representations of animal and human figures; elements which not only show the great artistic skills of the first dwellers of the island but also gives us an insight of their daily lives.

Highlights include the ‘Sleeping Lady’ from the Ħal Saflieni Hypogeum, the ‘Venus of Malta’ from Ħaġar Qim, bronze daggers recovered from the Bronze Age layers at Tarxien Temples, and the Horus and Anubis pendant and the anthropomorphic sarcophagus, both belonging to the Phoenician Period. The Museum provides the visitor with a good introduction to the prehistory and early history of the Maltese Island sand acts as a catalyst to the other archaeological sites in Malta. Works are currently in progress to include another hall dedicated to the Punic period and others dedicated to the Roman and Byzantine periods in Malta.

Information from:
Web: http://heritagemalta.org/museums-sites/national-museum-of-archaeology/

© Tony Blood - The National Museum of Archaeology. Valletta Malta, 25 August 2014

© Tony Blood – The National Museum of Archaeology. Valletta Malta, 25 August 2014

© Tony Blood - Jug with floral decoration from Tal-Liedna (Terracotta). The National Museum of Archaeology. Valletta Malta, 25 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Jug with floral decoration from Tal-Liedna (Terracotta). The National Museum of Archaeology. Valletta Malta, 25 August 2014

The Phoenicians buried their dead in a variety of ways. One of these was to put the corpse inside a coffin. Fashioned in wood, terracotta stone, stone, and marble, coffins consisted of a casket and a lid, and were often shaped like a human figure, a practice that was very popular in pharaonic Egypt. The coffin on display here was found at Għar Barka on the outskirts of Rabat (Malta) in 1797. Lead poured inside the grooves on the side of the coffin was meant to hold the lid firmly in place. In the Phoenician homeland, members of the royal family were buried in similar coffins, often re-using ones brought over from Egypt. They would have inscriptions written on the lids to curse anyone who disturbed their eternal sleep. © Tony Blood - Phoenician Coffin. The National Museum of Archaeology. Valletta Malta, 25 August 2014

The Phoenicians buried their dead in a variety of ways. One of these was to put the corpse inside a coffin. Fashioned in wood, terracotta stone, stone, and marble, coffins consisted of a casket and a lid, and were often shaped like a human figure, a practice that was very popular in pharaonic Egypt. The coffin on display here was found at Għar Barka on the outskirts of Rabat (Malta) in 1797. Lead poured inside the grooves on the side of the coffin was meant to hold the lid firmly in place. In the Phoenician homeland, members of the royal family were buried in similar coffins, often re-using ones brought over from Egypt. They would have inscriptions written on the lids to curse anyone who disturbed their eternal sleep.
© Tony Blood – Phoenician Coffin. The National Museum of Archaeology. Valletta Malta, 25 August 2014

© Tony Blood - Silver plate with commemorative dedication to Sir Alexander Ball (1757-1809) (Silver). The National Museum of Archaeology. Valletta Malta, 25 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Silver plate with commemorative dedication to Sir Alexander Ball (1757-1809) (Silver). The National Museum of Archaeology. Valletta Malta, 25 August 2014

© Tony Blood - Bronze Dagger from Għar Mirdum (Bronze and Bone). The National Museum of Archaeology. Valletta Malta, 25 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Bronze Dagger from Għar Mirdum (Bronze and Bone). The National Museum of Archaeology. Valletta Malta, 25 August 2014

© Tony Blood - Sir Temi Zammit's notebook no. 11. The National Museum of Archaeology. Valletta Malta, 25 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Sir Temi Zammit’s notebook no. 11. The National Museum of Archaeology. Valletta Malta, 25 August 2014

© Tony Blood - Human Skull from the Ħal Saflieni Hypogeum. The National Museum of Archaeology. Valletta Malta, 25 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Human Skull from the Ħal Saflieni Hypogeum. The National Museum of Archaeology. Valletta Malta, 25 August 2014

© Tony Blood - Sleeping Lady from the Ħal Saflieni Hypogeum. The National Museum of Archaeology. Valletta Malta, 25 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Sleeping Lady from the Ħal Saflieni Hypogeum. The National Museum of Archaeology. Valletta Malta, 25 August 2014

© Tony Blood - Venus of Malta. The National Museum of Archaeology. Valletta Malta, 25 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Venus of Malta. The National Museum of Archaeology. Valletta Malta, 25 August 2014

Mdina | Rabat, Malta | 24 July 2014

Mdina is Malta’s old capital city, with Rabat being its suburb. A Bronze Age village is believed to have once stood at one end of the hill where Mdina today lies. The area was subsequently occupied by the Phoenicians, the Carthaginians, and the Romans and became an important urban centre. Melita, as the city was known during Roman times, was at least three times the size of the present-day Mdina. (Zammit, p.85)

Information from:
Zammit, Vincent, 2011. Malta History & Tradition. BDL Publishing.

© Tony Blood - Mdina, Rabat, Malta, 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Mdina, Rabat, Malta, 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Mdina, Rabat, Malta, 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Mdina, Rabat, Malta, 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Mdina, Rabat, Malta, 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Mdina, Rabat, Malta, 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Mdina, Rabat, Malta, 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Mdina, Rabat, Malta, 24 July 2014

WWII Shelters | Wignacourt Museum | Rabat, Malta | 24 July 2014

The building, fully completed in 1749, is on three levels: the underground level consists of a labyrinth of Punic, Roman and Christian Hypogea with interesting architectural features as well as a complex of World War II shelters with two main corridors and fifty rooms.

Information from:
Web: http://www.wignacourtmuseum.com

© Tony Blood – WWII Shelters, Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – WWII Shelters, Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – WWII Shelters, Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – WWII Shelters, Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – WWII Shelters, Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – WWII Shelters, Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – WWII Shelters, Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – WWII Shelters, Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

Wignacourt Museum | Rabat, Malta | 24 July 2014

The main floor has an impressive picture gallery with works by Mattia Preti, Antoine Favray, Francesco Zahra and other Maltese as well as European Artists. Also a collection of 17th- 19th century Spanish, Italian and Maltese silver; a unique wooden altar used for the celebration of Mass on the galleys of the Order of the Knights of Malta; a collection of old relics and reliquaries, sculptures in wood, alabaster and bronze, including a medallion by Alessandro Algardi; maps, coins, prints and rare books among which is King Henry VIII’s ‘Septem Sacramants” written to confute Martin Luther and above all a baroque chapel for the private devotions of the residing chaplains.

Information from:
Web: http://www.wignacourtmuseum.com

© Tony Blood - Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Chapel, Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Chapel, Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Portrait of Pope Alexander VII (Formerly Fabio Chigi Inquisitor of Malta). Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Portrait of Pope Alexander VII (Formerly Fabio Chigi
Inquisitor of Malta). Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

Bridge Bar | Valletta, Malta | 22 July 2014

The Bridge Bar is open every Friday during the summer. Customers can sit outside on cushions on the steps and listen to Live-Jazz music.

© Tony Blood - Bridge Bar. Valletta Malta, 22 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Bridge Bar. Valletta Malta, 22 July 2014