Tag Archives: Fortification

St. Mark’s Tower | Baħar iċ-Ċagħaq, Malta | 1 October 2014

The De Redin Towers are a series of small fortified watch towers that Grandmaster Martin de Redin of the Order of Saint John built on the Maltese islands between the years 1658 and 1659. There are 13 on Malta and 1 on Gozo. The towers are in sight of each other, and provided a communication link between Gozo and Grand Harbour, in addition to functioning as watchtowers against attack by Corsairs. They were also designed to withstand an attack if the need arose.

The design is based on the design of the last of the five original Lascaris towers, the Sciuta Tower at Wied iż-Żurrieq, that Grand Master Giovanni Paolo Lascaris, de Redin’s predecessor, had built in 1640. The locals refer to both the five Lascaris towers and the thirteen de Redin towers as “de Redin towers”.

Nine of the fourteen towers still exist today and most are in good condition and accessible to the public. Two towers were destroyed but the remains still survive, while another three were completely demolished and no remains survive.

De Redin towers are featured on the coats of arms of the Armed Forces of Malta, the Malta Stock Exchange and the local council of Pembroke.

Information from:
Web: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/De_Redin_towers

This is one of Grand Master de Redin’s watch towers and is situated a few hundred metres from the Għallis Tower. Also known as St Mark’s Tower, this is probably the third of the thirteen towers built by Grand Master de Redin. The stone work cost 408 scudi and was paid for by the Grand Master. Its construction and history is similar to that for Ghallis Tower and it was built between March 1658 and July of the following year together with the other twelve towers. During the British period a small room was built in front of the Tower to serve as a guard room but only its foundations remain. On the first floor there is an inlet to an underground well.

Information from:
Web: http://www.visitmalta.com/en/info/qaletmarkutower

© Tony Blood - St. Mark's Tower. Baħar iċ-Ċagħaq, Malta, 1 October 2014

© Tony Blood – St. Mark’s Tower. Baħar iċ-Ċagħaq, Malta, 1 October 2014

Selmun Palace | Mellieħa, Malta | 30 September 2014

This palace was built by the Knights in 1783 on a plan by architect Dominic Cachia. Although bearing fine military architecture, it only served as a summer residence and a meeting place for hunting. It resembles Verdala Palace. Inside, one finds to large holes on top of each other and for side rooms. Between 1792 and 1979 it housed a Chapel dedicated to Our Lady of Ransom and was often used by prominent people. The Monte della Redenzione coat of arms over the main entrance shows three loaves and the letter R. Holes visible on the Palace’s facade resulted from an aerial attack during World War II.

Information from:
Rural Development Program for Malta 2007-2013.
The European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development.
Europe Investing in Rural Areas.

© Tony Blood - Selmun Palace, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Selmun Palace, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

Fort Campbell | Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta | 30 September 2014

Fort Campbell was built in 1937 and was armed with two guns to defend the coastal waters of Mellieha and St. Paul’s Bay against invasion. Another anti aircraft gun was added later. One can still see the gun emplacements, the soldier’s quarters, the underground magazine and the Fire Control Command. Several pillboxes and machine gun openings were constructed all around the fort. The fort was garrisoned by 200 RMA soldiers. It’s generator fed the Search Lights facing St. Paul’s islands. This fort was abandoned around 1970.

Information from:
Rural Development Programme for Malta 2007-2013
The European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development
Europe Investing in Rural Areas

© Tony Blood - Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood - Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood - Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood - Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood - Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood - Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood - Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood - Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood - Fire Station, Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Fire Station, Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood - Fire Station, Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Fire Station, Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

Lippija Tower | Mġarr, Malta | 29 September 2014

Lippija Tower, completed in 1637, was the first Lascaris tower to be built. It was built overlooking Ġnejna Bay, and Lascaris himself personally completely financed its construction. It is two storeys high with a flat roof and a parapet. By the early 2000s it was abandoned in a state of disrepair and it was in danger of collapsing. In 2003 the Ministry of Resources and Infrastructure restored it and it is now in good condition.

Information from:
Web: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lascaris_towers#cite_note-1
Web: http://www.timesofmalta.com/articles/view/20030721/local/lippija-tower-restoration-taken-in-hand.145180

© Tony Blood - Lippija Tower. Mġarr, Malta, 29 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Lippija Tower. Mġarr, Malta, 29 September 2014

Għajn Tuffieħa Tower | Mellieħa, Malta | 3 September 2014

The Lascaris towers are a series of mostly coastal watchtowers that the Order of Saint John (Knights of Malta) built as military fortifications on the island of Malta.

Giovanni Paolo Lascaris became Grand Master of the Order of Saint John in 1636. He commissioned the building of five towers for the Maltese coast. The military architect Vincenzo Maculani, who had been sent to Malta by Pope Innocent X, was responsible for their design and construction, which took place between 1637 and 1640.

Modern day locals often refer to both the five Lascaris towers and the thirteen later de Redin towers collectively as “de Redin towers”. The Wignacourt towerspreceded the Lascaris towers.

Għajn Tuffieħa Tower, also known as Għajn Mixkuka Tower, was built on the cliffs overlooking Għajn Tuffieħa Bay close to Mellieħa and Mġarr on the north west coast of Malta. The tower was built on the site of a medieval watch post. It was originally armed with a half pounder gun and garrisoned by four men. The men were paid by the Universita of Mdina.

The tower was restored in 2000 with the support of the Director of Public Projects and the philanthropic organisation Din l-Art Ħelwa. In 2012, the tower was vandalized when graffiti was sprayed on it but this was removed. The tower continued to be renovated until the Gaia Foundation opened it to the public in 2013 as part of a peace grove containing over 20 species of indigenous plants.

Information from:
Web: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lascaris_towers#G.C4.A7ajn_Tuffie.C4.A7a_Tower

© Tony Blood - Għajn Tuffieħa Tower, Għajn Tuffieħa Bay. Mellieħa, Malta, 4 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Għajn Tuffieħa Tower, Għajn Tuffieħa Bay. Mellieħa, Malta, 4 August 2014