Tag Archives: Harbour

Bay View | Mellieħa, Malta | 1 September 2014

Mellieħa ([məˈliːhə], or il-Mellieħa) is a large village (pop. 10,003 in March 2013) in the northwestern part of Malta. It is a popular tourist destination during the summer months. Mellieħa as a village developed under British colonization after the British encouraged people to settle in the area by giving leases to the population. For two centuries previously, the area was abandoned due to fear from attacks of corsairs and Saracens. Before that, only a few villagers lived in the area.

Information from:
Web: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mellieħa

© Tony Blood - Mellieħa, Malta, 1 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Mellieħa, Malta, 1 September 2014

Xwenji Bay | Marsalforn, Gozo | 30 August 2014

Marsalforn, meaning ‘bakery harbour’, is Gozo’s main seaside town. During the summer, it becomes a bustling, lively resort. There is a small but pleasant sandy bank on the harbour with safe bathing and good rocky coastline towards Qbajjar which is excellent for snorkelling.

The resort has a good range of accommodation from seafront self-catering apartments to hotels. Marsalforn is characterised by its harbour-side cafes and restaurants, many serving fresh fish. The small harbour is the main port for a fleet of traditional ‘luzzijiet’ trawlers and smaller fishing boats. The beauty of Marsalforn is its relaxed atmosphere, even in the height of summer.

Information from:
Web: http://www.visitmalta.com/en/info/marsalforn

© Tony Blood - Xwenji Bay, Masalforn, Gozo, 30 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Xwenji Bay, Masalforn, Gozo, 30 August 2014

Market | Marsaxlokk, Malta | 17 August 2014

The Marsaxlokk market is a very popular attraction featuring in many guide books and therefore attracts many tourists and locals who go to buy fresh fish and seafood caught during the same morning as well as everyday items.

The market is very interesting and attractive as many different items are sold and people come here to socialize. Although the Marsaxlokk Sunday Market was originally a fish market, it has developed, and now it also sells locally produced honey, fruit jams, wine as well as vegetables, souvenirs and clothes. After shopping at the market, you can have lunch in one of the many seafood restaurants scattered in the picturesque bay of Marsaxlokk.

Information from:
Web: http://www.malta.com/en/attraction/shopping/marsaxlokk-market

© Tony Blood - Market. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 17 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Market. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 17 August 2014

Senglea, Malta | 30 July 2014

This small city, one of the so-called Three Cities, stands on a narrow promontory jutting into Grand Harbour.

The land was fortified in 1551 by Grand Master Claude de la Sengle. The Maltese often use the area’s earlier name, L-Isla, meaning the island or perhaps short for `peninsula’. During the Great Siege of 1565, Senglea was protected by Fort St. Michael on its landward side and by Fort St. Angelo on the tip of Vittoriosa across the creek. The heroic role played by its people led Grand Master Jean de la Valette to give the city the title of Citta’ Invicta, the invincible city. Like its sister cities, Senglea suffered heavy damage during World War II. More than 75 percent of its buildings were destroyed. The parish church dedicated to the Nativity of the Madonna was rebuilt and retains its artistic heritage.

The city is noted for its superb harbour views across to Valletta from Safe Haven Gardens at Senglea Point. The stone vedette, known as Il-Gardjola, on the bastion-point served as a look-out post to guard the harbour entrance. The sculptured eye and ear above its windows are symbols of vigilance.

Information from:
Web: http://www.visitmalta.com/en/info/senglea

© Tony Blood - View of Birgu. Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood – View of Birgu. Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Senglea Harbour, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Senglea Harbour, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Steps. Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Steps. Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Triq il-Vitorja. Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Triq il-Vitorja. Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Door Knob. Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Door Knob. Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Point Sally Port, Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Point Sally Port, Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Point Sally Port, Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Point Sally Port, Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

Marsaxlokk, Malta | 23 July 2014

Marsaxlokk Bay is Malta’s second largest natural harbour. It is the best place to see the colourful, traditional Maltese fishing boats, the Luzzus, with the mythical eye painted on their prows.

The village is the Islands’ main fishing harbour; its Sunday fish market a fascinating insight into local life and a traditional industry. The stalls brim with the night’s catch – fish of all shapes, colours and sizes. The village itself has many good fish restaurants. Marsaxlokk derives its name from the Arabic word marsa, meaning harbour, and Maltese for the south-easterly Mediterranean wind, the Xlokk (Sirocco in Italian). Marsaxlokk, with its sheltered habour, was an easy landing place for pirates and the Ottoman Turks. It was here that the Ottoman Turks landed for an attack which ended in the Great Siege of 1565. Napoleon’s army landed here in 1798; and in recent times, the harbour was the scene of the Bush-Gorbachev Summit,1989.

The headland to the left of the Bay is Delimara Point. It has two attractive, secluded rocky inlets suitable for swimming: Peter’s Pool; and the furthermost part of the headland. Fort Delimara, on the west of the peninsula, was built by the British in 1881 to guard the entrance to Marsaxlokk Bay.

Information from:
Web: http://www.visitmalta.com/en/info/marsaxlokk

© Tony Blood - Boy Fishing. Marsaxlokk Harbour. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 23 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Boy Fishing. Marsaxlokk Harbour. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 23 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Marsaxlokk Harbour. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 23 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Marsaxlokk Harbour. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 23 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Marsaxlokk Harbour. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 23 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Marsaxlokk Harbour. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 23 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Love Malta. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 23 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Love Malta. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 23 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Red Chair. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 23 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Red Chair. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 23 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Marsaxlokk Harbour. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 23 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Marsaxlokk Harbour. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 23 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Marsaxlokk Harbour. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 23 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Marsaxlokk Harbour. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 23 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Marsaxlokk Harbour. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 23 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Marsaxlokk Harbour. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 23 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Marsaxlokk Harbour. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 23 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Marsaxlokk Harbour. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 23 July 2014