Tag Archives: History

Casa Rocca Piccola | Valletta, Malta | 2 October 2014

Casa Rocca Piccola is a 16th-century palace in Malta, and home of the noble de Piro family. It is situated in Valletta, the capital city of Malta. There are daily tours. The history of Casa Rocca Piccola goes back over 400 years to an era in which the Knights of St John, having successfully fought off the invading Turks in 1565, decided to build a prestigious city to rival other European capitals such as Paris and Venice. Palaces were designed for prestige and aesthetic beauty in most of Valletta’s streets, and bastion walls fortified the new sixteenth-century city. Casa Rocca Piccola was one of two houses built in Valletta by Admiral Don Pietro la Rocca. It is referenced in maps of the time as “la casa con giardino” meaning, the house with the garden, as normally houses in Valletta were not allowed gardens. Changes were made in the late 18th century to divide the house into two smaller houses. Further changes were made in 1918 and before the second world war an air raid shelters was added. The Casa Rocca Piccola Family Shelter is the second air-raid shelter to be dug in Malta. In 2000 a major restoration project saw the two houses that make up Casa Rocca Piccola reunited.

Information from: Web: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casa_Rocca_Piccola Further information: Web: http://www.casaroccapiccola.com/

© Tony Blood - Entrance Sign. Casa Rocca Piccola, Valletta, Malta, 2 October 2014

© Tony Blood – Entrance Sign. Casa Rocca Piccola, Valletta, Malta, 2 October 2014

© Tony Blood - Staircase and Hallway. Casa Rocca Piccola, Valletta, Malta, 2 October 2014

© Tony Blood – Staircase and Hallway. Casa Rocca Piccola, Valletta, Malta, 2 October 2014

© Tony Blood - Chinese Room. Casa Rocca Piccola, Valletta, Malta, 2 October 2014

© Tony Blood – Chinese Room. Casa Rocca Piccola, Valletta, Malta, 2 October 2014

© Tony Blood - The Sala Grande. Casa Rocca Piccola, Valletta, Malta, 2 October 2014

© Tony Blood – The Sala Grande. Casa Rocca Piccola, Valletta, Malta, 2 October 2014

© Tony Blood - The Sala Grande. Casa Rocca Piccola, Valletta, Malta, 2 October 2014

© Tony Blood – The Sala Grande. Casa Rocca Piccola, Valletta, Malta, 2 October 2014

© Tony Blood - The Archives. Casa Rocca Piccola, Valletta, Malta, 2 October 2014

© Tony Blood – The Archives. Casa Rocca Piccola, Valletta, Malta, 2 October 2014

© Tony Blood - Casa Rocca Piccola, Valletta, Malta, 2 October 2014

© Tony Blood – Casa Rocca Piccola, Valletta, Malta, 2 October 2014

© Tony Blood - The Cabinet. Casa Rocca Piccola, Valletta, Malta, 2 October 2014

© Tony Blood – The Cabinet. Casa Rocca Piccola, Valletta, Malta, 2 October 2014

© Tony Blood - The Four-Poster Room. Casa Rocca Piccola, Valletta, Malta, 2 October 2014

© Tony Blood – The Four-Poster Room. Casa Rocca Piccola, Valletta, Malta, 2 October 2014

© Tony Blood - The Green Room. Casa Rocca Piccola, Valletta, Malta, 2 October 2014

© Tony Blood – The Green Room. Casa Rocca Piccola, Valletta, Malta, 2 October 2014

© Tony Blood - The Library. Casa Rocca Piccola, Valletta, Malta, 2 October 2014

© Tony Blood – The Library. Casa Rocca Piccola, Valletta, Malta, 2 October 2014

© Tony Blood - The Porphyry Room. Casa Rocca Piccola, Valletta, Malta, 2 October 2014

© Tony Blood – The Porphyry Room. Casa Rocca Piccola, Valletta, Malta, 2 October 2014

© Tony Blood - The Blue Room. Casa Rocca Piccola, Valletta, Malta, 2 October 2014

© Tony Blood – The Blue Room. Casa Rocca Piccola, Valletta, Malta, 2 October 2014

© Tony Blood - The Summer Dining Room. Casa Rocca Piccola, Valletta, Malta, 2 October 2014

© Tony Blood – The Summer Dining Room. Casa Rocca Piccola, Valletta, Malta, 2 October 2014

© Tony Blood - Small Bomb Shelter. Casa Rocca Piccola, Valletta, Malta, 2 October 2014

© Tony Blood – Small Bomb Shelter. Casa Rocca Piccola, Valletta, Malta, 2 October 2014

© Tony Blood - Family Bomb Shelter. Casa Rocca Piccola, Valletta, Malta, 2 October 2014

© Tony Blood – Family Bomb Shelter. Casa Rocca Piccola, Valletta, Malta, 2 October 2014

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St. Mary’s Tower | Comino | 1 October 2014

The Santa Marija Tower on Comino formed part of the early system of towers which the Order set up to facilitate defence and communication between the Ċittadella in Gozo and Mdina. It later became a key location of the system of towers built along the coast. The decision to build this Tower was taken by Grand Master Alof de Wignacourt in 1618, and was financed by the Grand Master himself, by the sale of the brushwood on the island and from the profits made by the resettled farmers. The site chosen was some eighty metres above sea level.

The design of the Tower was square in plan with four corner turrets. The bulk of the Tower is twelve metres high and stands on a plinth some eight metres high. A three metre wide strip was laid along the top surface of the plinth to enable the defenders to move easily to any endangered point. The walls of the Tower are about six metres thick and the four corner turrets are extended perpendicularly and crowned with a battlement top.

Information from:
Web: http://www.visitmalta.com/en/info/santamariatowercomino

© Tony Blood - St. Mary's Tower, Comino, 1 October 2014

© Tony Blood – St. Mary’s Tower, Comino, 1 October 2014

Ġgantija Temples | Xagħra, Gozo | 1 October 2014

Ġgantija

The awe-inspiring megalithic complex of Ġgantija was erected in three stages over a period of several hundred years (c.3600-3000 BC) by the community of farmers and herders inhabiting the small and isolated island of Gozo (Malta) at the centre of the Mediterranean.

Ġgantija consists of two temple units built side by side, enclosed within a single massive boundary wall, and sharing the same facade. Both temples have a single and central doorway, opening onto a common and spacious forecourt that is in turn raised on a high terrace. Rituals of life and fertility seem to have been practiced within these precincts, while the sophisticated architectural achievements reveal that something really exceptional was taking place in the Maltese Islands more than five thousand years ago.

This complex stayed in use for about one thousand years, down to the mid third millennium BC, when the Maltese Temple Culture disappeared abruptly and mysteriously. Eventually, the successive inhabitants of the Early Bronze Age (2500-1500 BC) adopted the site as a cremation cemetery.

Information from:
Heritage Malta

© Tony Blood - Ġgantija Temples, Xagħra, Gozo, 1 October 2014

© Tony Blood – Ġgantija Temples, Xagħra, Gozo, 1 October 2014

© Tony Blood - Ġgantija Temples, Xagħra, Gozo, 1 October 2014

© Tony Blood – Ġgantija Temples, Xagħra, Gozo, 1 October 2014

Graffiti | Ġgantija Temples | Xagħra, Gozo | 1 October 2014

On both sides of the doorway, two well-finished megaliths are covered in graffiti, some of which date back to the early 1800s. For many years, visitors incised their names or initials on the stone, gravely damaging the surface of many megaliths in the temples.

Information from:
Heritage Malta

© Tony Blood - Graffiti. Ġgantija Temples, Xagħra, Gozo, 1 October 2014

© Tony Blood – Graffiti. Ġgantija Temples, Xagħra, Gozo, 1 October 2014

Salt Pans | Baħar iċ-Ċagħaq, Malta | 26 September 2014

© Tony Blood - Salt Pans, Baħar iċ-Ċagħaq, Naxxar, Malta, 26 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Salt Pans, Baħar iċ-Ċagħaq, Naxxar, Malta, 26 September 2014

© Tony Blood - Salt Pans, Baħar iċ-Ċagħaq, Naxxar, Malta, 26 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Salt Pans, Baħar iċ-Ċagħaq, Naxxar, Malta, 26 September 2014

© Tony Blood - Salt Pans, Baħar iċ-Ċagħaq, Naxxar, Malta, 26 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Salt Pans, Baħar iċ-Ċagħaq, Naxxar, Malta, 26 September 2014

© Tony Blood - Salt Pans, Baħar iċ-Ċagħaq, Naxxar, Malta, 26 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Salt Pans, Baħar iċ-Ċagħaq, Naxxar, Malta, 26 September 2014

Palazzo Parisio | Naxxar, Malta | 25 September 2014

© Tony Blood - Palazzo Parisio, Naxxar, Malta, 25 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Palazzo Parisio, Naxxar, Malta, 25 September 2014

© Tony Blood - Palazzo Parisio, Naxxar, Malta, 25 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Palazzo Parisio, Naxxar, Malta, 25 September 2014

© Tony Blood - Palazzo Parisio, Naxxar, Malta, 25 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Palazzo Parisio, Naxxar, Malta, 25 September 2014

© Tony Blood - Palazzo Parisio, Naxxar, Malta, 25 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Palazzo Parisio, Naxxar, Malta, 25 September 2014

© Tony Blood - Palazzo Parisio, Naxxar, Malta, 25 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Palazzo Parisio, Naxxar, Malta, 25 September 2014

© Tony Blood - Palazzo Parisio, Naxxar, Malta, 25 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Palazzo Parisio, Naxxar, Malta, 25 September 2014

© Tony Blood - Palazzo Parisio, Naxxar, Malta, 25 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Palazzo Parisio, Naxxar, Malta, 25 September 2014

© Tony Blood - Palazzo Parisio, Naxxar, Malta, 25 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Palazzo Parisio, Naxxar, Malta, 25 September 2014

© Tony Blood - Palazzo Parisio, Naxxar, Malta, 25 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Palazzo Parisio, Naxxar, Malta, 25 September 2014

© Tony Blood - Palazzo Parisio, Naxxar, Malta, 25 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Palazzo Parisio, Naxxar, Malta, 25 September 2014

© Tony Blood - Palazzo Parisio, Naxxar, Malta, 25 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Palazzo Parisio, Naxxar, Malta, 25 September 2014

© Tony Blood - Palazzo Parisio, Naxxar, Malta, 25 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Palazzo Parisio, Naxxar, Malta, 25 September 2014

Skorba Temples | Żebbiegħ Mġarr, Malta | 19 September 2014

The site of Skorba lies in the hamlet of Żebbiegħ, on the outskirts of Mġarr, overlooking the nearby valley and providing a spectacular view of the surrounding landscape.

Excavated by David Trump in the early 1960s, quite late when compared to other similar sites, this temple is unique for providing crucial evidence concerning the domestic aspect of the prehistoric people, including the temple builders themselves. This archaeological site includes the remains of two megalithic temple structures, one of which dates from the earliest phase of megalithic construction – the Ġgantija Phase, while the other was constructed at a later stage in prehistory, that is, the Tarxien Phase.

In addition, there are also the remains of several domestic huts, in which the prehistoric temple builders used to dwell. Some structures date from before the Temple Period (i.e. before 3600 BC), and therefore, are amongst the oldest constructed structures on the Maltese Islands. Scientific studies on these structures have provided crucial evidence on the life-sustaining resources which were available at the time and have also thrown light on the dietary patterns of the prehistoric people.

The archaeological value of the site and its contribution to our understanding of Maltese prehistory, were recognised by the international community and by UNESCO in 1992, when it was inscribed on the UNESCO World Heritage List along with five other temple sites on the islands. In the words of David Trump himself, this site was not only as important as any of the others for the part it played in uncovering the whole prehistory of Malta, [but] it was more important than all the others put together.

Information from:
Web: http://heritagemalta.org/museums-sites/skorba/

© Tony Blood - Skorba Temples, Żebbiegħ, Mġarr, Malta, 19 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Skorba Temples, Żebbiegħ, Mġarr, Malta, 19 September 2014