Tag Archives: Mellieħa

Selmun Palace | Mellieħa, Malta | 30 September 2014

This palace was built by the Knights in 1783 on a plan by architect Dominic Cachia. Although bearing fine military architecture, it only served as a summer residence and a meeting place for hunting. It resembles Verdala Palace. Inside, one finds to large holes on top of each other and for side rooms. Between 1792 and 1979 it housed a Chapel dedicated to Our Lady of Ransom and was often used by prominent people. The Monte della Redenzione coat of arms over the main entrance shows three loaves and the letter R. Holes visible on the Palace’s facade resulted from an aerial attack during World War II.

Information from:
Rural Development Program for Malta 2007-2013.
The European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development.
Europe Investing in Rural Areas.

© Tony Blood - Selmun Palace, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Selmun Palace, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

Fort Campbell | Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta | 30 September 2014

Fort Campbell was built in 1937 and was armed with two guns to defend the coastal waters of Mellieha and St. Paul’s Bay against invasion. Another anti aircraft gun was added later. One can still see the gun emplacements, the soldier’s quarters, the underground magazine and the Fire Control Command. Several pillboxes and machine gun openings were constructed all around the fort. The fort was garrisoned by 200 RMA soldiers. It’s generator fed the Search Lights facing St. Paul’s islands. This fort was abandoned around 1970.

Information from:
Rural Development Programme for Malta 2007-2013
The European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development
Europe Investing in Rural Areas

© Tony Blood - Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood - Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood - Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood - Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood - Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood - Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood - Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood - Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood - Fire Station, Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Fire Station, Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood - Fire Station, Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Fire Station, Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

Salt Pans | Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta | 30 September 2014

Salt is a very good preservative of foodstuffs and here small salt-pans were constructed by private families towards that end. In 1930 the Calafáto company took over this area at Blata and changed it into larger salt-pans, using the salt in it’s animal hides’ tanning factory at Marsa. These bath-shaped salt-pans lead sea water from one to the other by gravity. They were still in use up to the eighties of the last century when a big storm caused irreparable damage to them.

Information from:
Rural Development Programme for Malta 2007-2013
The European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development
Europe Investing in Rural Areas

© Tony Blood - Salt Pans. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Salt Pans. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood - Salt Pans. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Salt Pans. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood - Salt Pans. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Salt Pans. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood - Salt Pans. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Salt Pans. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood - Salt Pans. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Salt Pans. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood - Salt Pans. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Salt Pans. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

St. Paul’s Island | Malta | 26 September 2014

St Paul’s Island, also known as Selmunett, is a small island off Selmun near the north-east of the main island of Malta. St Paul’s Island is sometimes split into two islands by a shallow isthmus, and it is therefore sometimes referred to in the plural as St Paul’s Islands. St Paul’s Island has been uninhabited since World War II, and it is the largest uninhabited island of Malta.

The Acts of the Apostles tell the story of how Paul the Apostle was shipwrecked on an island which some scholars have identified as Malta while on his way to Rome to face charges. Traditionally, St. Paul’s Bay and St Paul’s Island are identified as the location for this shipwreck.

In 1576, Marco di Maria was being chased by Barbary corsairs off the coast of Malta. He navigated his vessel through the narrow channel between St Paul’s Island and Malta, but when the pirates followed him they ran aground and were captured. As a result of this, the Grandmaster Jean de la Cassière gave St Paul’s Islands to di Maria. Since he was a member of the Salamone family, the islands were often called Selmunett.

In 1844 a prominent statue of Saint Paul was erected on the island. It was sculpted by Segismondo Dimech from Valletta and Salvatore Dimech from Lija. The statue was officially inaugurated and blessed on 21 September 1845. It was restored by Din l-Art Ħelwa in 1996 and again in 2007. It will be restored once more in 2014.

Until the 1930s, a farmer called Vincenzo Borg, nicknamed Ta’ Bajdafin, lived on the island. His farmhouse was located close to the statue of Saint Paul. He abandoned the dwelling and the fields on the island just before World War II started. The farmhouse was a three-chambered structure with a heavily buttressed wall at its lower level. It resembled the Lascaris or De Redin towers, although it was never used for military purposes. Since it was abandoned, the upper room has collapsed and the structure is now in ruins. Pope John Paul II visited the island by boat during his visit to Malta in 1990.

Saint Paul’s Islands lie about 80 metres off the coast of Mellieħa, Malta. The island can split into two islands by a shallow isthmus according to the sea level, and when they are split the larger island on the west is known as Saint Paul’s Island while the smaller one on the east is known as Quartz Island. Both islands are made of upper coralline limestone. Saint Paul’s Island’s landscape is a maritime garigue dominated by Golden samphire, Maltese fleabane and other species. Quartz Island is more exposed and has less vegetation than the main island. A population of the land snail Trochoidea spratti can be found on the islands. Wild rabbits used to live on the island but the population died off due to disease. A subspecies of the Maltese wall lizard known as Podarcis filfolensis kieselbachi also lived there but the population apparently became extinct in 2005.

Information from:
Web: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Paul’s_Island

© Tony Blood - St. Paul's Island, Selmun, Malta.  26 September 2014

© Tony Blood – St. Paul’s Island, Selmun, Malta. 26 September 2014

© Tony Blood - St. Paul's Island, Selmun, Malta.  26 September 2014

© Tony Blood – St. Paul’s Island, Selmun, Malta. 26 September 2014

Garrigue Steppe, Għajn Tuffieħa Bay | Mellieħa, Malta | 15 September 2014

Għajn Tuffieħa Bay is a red beach a short distance south of Golden Bay. It is quieter than Golden Bay and often visited by the Maltese themselves, as well as tourist visitors. In order to reach this beach one needs to descend a hill on a staircase of 200 steps. On top of the cliffs west of Għajn Tuffieħa bay there is an old defense tower built in 1637. It is one of the seven towers built by Grand Master Giovanni Paolo Lascaris, of the Knights Hospitaller. Għajn Tuffieħa has a cafe, Riviera Martinique, at the foot of the access staircase.

Information from:
Web: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Għajn_Tuffieħa

© Tony Blood - Garrigue Steppe, Għajn Tuffieħa Bay, Mellieħa, Malta, 15 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Garrigue Steppe, Għajn Tuffieħa Bay, Mellieħa, Malta, 15 September 2014

Sunset | Għajn Tuffieħa Bay, Mellieħa, Malta | 4 September 2014

Għajn Tuffieħa is a popular sandy beach nestling below hills and an unusually-shaped promontory. It is unspoilt and undeveloped, yet has the facilities you need to enjoy a day on the beach sun lounger and umbrella hire, pedallos and a small snack bar.

The beach can only be reached down a steep flight of steps or by a gravel track. The hillside behind is a designated natural park. The foundation managing the hillside has planted tamarisk and samphire to prevent further erosion at this beautiful natural bay. Għajn Tuffieħa’s location means it is not usually as crowded as its neighbour, Golden Bay. However its fine sand and rural surroundings make it the more alluring. The beach is generally safe for swimming but it is prone to strong currents when the wind is to the north-west. A red flag indicates when bathing should be limited to the shallow waters only. A headland to the west side of the bay separates this beach from Ġnejna Bay. All the area is a Special Area of Conservation (SAC) due to unique geological features. Għajn Tuffieħa Bay is managed by the NGO, GAIA Foundation. Beach management includes the services of a lifeguard and safety ropes affixed along the bay. In 2011 the beach was awarded a Beach of Quality award and for 2012. Tip: Linger on after most bathers leave for home and enjoy the best time on the beach – the spectacular sunsets.

Information from:
Web: http://www.visitmalta.com/en/info/ghajntuffieha

© Tony Blood - Sunset. Għajn Tuffieħa Bay, Mellieħa, Malta, 31 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Sunset. Għajn Tuffieħa Bay, Mellieħa, Malta, 31 August 2014

Mellieħa Bay | Mellieħa, Malta | 4 September 2014

Mellieħa Bay is the largest beach of thirteen pocket beaches around Mellieħa. It is a sheltered beach between two headlands and is situated on the Northern part of the Island.

Its sand has a low gradient slope and together with its clear, shallow water makes it the most popular family beach on the island. Mellieħa Bay has most facilities and services including restaurants and two hotels. Some parts of the bay are designated for water sports and wind surfing. Beach management is operated between June and September by the Malta Tourism Authority with the cooperation of Mellieħa Local Council. It includes the services of lifeguards, a small First Aid clinic, two beach supervisors and a number of persons in charge of beach maintenance. It is an accessible beach furnished with a mobile toilet, wheelchair access and special sand wheelchair buggies for physically impaired bathers. In 2011 the beach was awarded a Beach of Quality Award. Mellieħa Bay has an old castle perched on one side while the old village of Mellieħa is situated high on the opposite side. The hinterland of Mellieħa Bay was once an important salt flat and wetland, known as L-Għadira. It is now a Nature Reserve that boasts of indigenous flora and fauna, and is popular with bird watchers who study local and migratory birds. Mellieħa Bay is also referred to as L-Għadira.

Information from:
Web: http://www.visitmalta.com/en/info/melliehabay

© Tony Blood - Mellieħa Bay, Mellieħa, Malta, 4 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Mellieħa Bay, Mellieħa, Malta, 4 September 2014

Għajn Tuffieħa Tower | Mellieħa, Malta | 3 September 2014

The Lascaris towers are a series of mostly coastal watchtowers that the Order of Saint John (Knights of Malta) built as military fortifications on the island of Malta.

Giovanni Paolo Lascaris became Grand Master of the Order of Saint John in 1636. He commissioned the building of five towers for the Maltese coast. The military architect Vincenzo Maculani, who had been sent to Malta by Pope Innocent X, was responsible for their design and construction, which took place between 1637 and 1640.

Modern day locals often refer to both the five Lascaris towers and the thirteen later de Redin towers collectively as “de Redin towers”. The Wignacourt towerspreceded the Lascaris towers.

Għajn Tuffieħa Tower, also known as Għajn Mixkuka Tower, was built on the cliffs overlooking Għajn Tuffieħa Bay close to Mellieħa and Mġarr on the north west coast of Malta. The tower was built on the site of a medieval watch post. It was originally armed with a half pounder gun and garrisoned by four men. The men were paid by the Universita of Mdina.

The tower was restored in 2000 with the support of the Director of Public Projects and the philanthropic organisation Din l-Art Ħelwa. In 2012, the tower was vandalized when graffiti was sprayed on it but this was removed. The tower continued to be renovated until the Gaia Foundation opened it to the public in 2013 as part of a peace grove containing over 20 species of indigenous plants.

Information from:
Web: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lascaris_towers#G.C4.A7ajn_Tuffie.C4.A7a_Tower

© Tony Blood - Għajn Tuffieħa Tower, Għajn Tuffieħa Bay. Mellieħa, Malta, 4 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Għajn Tuffieħa Tower, Għajn Tuffieħa Bay. Mellieħa, Malta, 4 August 2014

Parish Church of Mellieħa | Mellieħa, Malta | 1 September 2014

The Parish Church of Mellieha is dedicated to the Birth of Our Lady, and was built between 1881 and 1898. All the stone was cut from a nearby quarry at l-Ahrax tal-Mellieha and transported up to Mellieha by the local peasants, who worked laboriously to see their wish of having a new church come true. Once the church’s building was completed, the Parish Priests Dun Frangisk Magri, Dun Carlo Cortis and Dun Indri Fenech endeavoured to embellish the interior. 

Thus between 1920 and 1940 the belfries and dome were erected, five bellsdedicated to St. Frances, St. Joseph, St. Anthony, St. Paul and the Virgin Marywere brought from Milan, and the church altars were decorated with paintings by the best Maltese artists, including the renowned Giuseppe Calì and Lazzru Pisani.

Information from:
Web: http://www.mellieha.com/parish_church.htm

© Tony Blood - Parish Church of Mellieħa. Mellieħa, Malta, 1 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Parish Church of Mellieħa. Mellieħa, Malta, 1 September 2014

Bay View | Mellieħa, Malta | 1 September 2014

Mellieħa ([məˈliːhə], or il-Mellieħa) is a large village (pop. 10,003 in March 2013) in the northwestern part of Malta. It is a popular tourist destination during the summer months. Mellieħa as a village developed under British colonization after the British encouraged people to settle in the area by giving leases to the population. For two centuries previously, the area was abandoned due to fear from attacks of corsairs and Saracens. Before that, only a few villagers lived in the area.

Information from:
Web: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mellieħa

© Tony Blood - Mellieħa, Malta, 1 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Mellieħa, Malta, 1 September 2014

St. Agatha’s Tower | Mellieħa, Malta | 1 September 2014

Also known as the Red Tower (due to the colour it was painted and restored in), Grand Master Lascaris built St. Agatha’s Tower in 1647. At the time of its construction, it was the furthest outpost from Valletta and served as a signal post for communication with Gozo. One of the main defensive positions during the time of the Knights, it was equipped with a cannon and garrison of 30 men.

The entrance to the Tower is approached by a flight of steps separated from the door by a drawbridge. Square in plan with four corner towers rising from the base, the outer walls are about four metres thick, through which small windows were cut. In the 18th century, a low star-shaped entrenchment was added. During the British period the tower was used for defence purposes and was manned during both world wars. In recent times it was equipped as a radar station by the Armed Forces of Malta.

Information from:
Web: http://www.visitmalta.com/en/info/stagathastower

© Tony Blood - St. Agatha's Tower (The Red Tower). Mellieħa, Malta, 1 September 2014

© Tony Blood – St. Agatha’s Tower (The Red Tower). Mellieħa, Malta, 1 September 2014

© Tony Blood - St. Agatha's Tower (The Red Tower). Mellieħa, Malta, 1 September 2014

© Tony Blood – St. Agatha’s Tower (The Red Tower). Mellieħa, Malta, 1 September 2014

© Tony Blood - St. Agatha's Tower (The Red Tower). Mellieħa, Malta, 1 September 2014

© Tony Blood – St. Agatha’s Tower (The Red Tower). Mellieħa, Malta, 1 September 2014

© Tony Blood - St. Agatha's Tower (The Red Tower). Mellieħa, Malta, 1 September 2014

© Tony Blood – St. Agatha’s Tower (The Red Tower). Mellieħa, Malta, 1 September 2014

Madonna Statue | Chapel of the Immaculate Conception | L-Aħrax, Mellieha, Malta | 27 August 2014

The Madonna Statue is located in front of the Immaculate Conception Chapel at the end of Marfa Ridge road. It was built in 1870 with an accompanying chapel which, legend has it, was built by a fisherman in thanks for surviving when his boat capsized. The original chapel was at one point in danger of collapsing so a new one was built in 1961. This is an idyllic spot for those searching for some untouched countryside, and is often used for picnics.

Information from:
Web: http://exploremellieha.com/placesofinterest

© Tony Blood - Madonna Statue. Chapel of Immaculate Conception. Mellieha, Malta, 27 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Madonna Statue. Chapel of Immaculate Conception. Mellieha, Malta, 27 August 2014

© Tony Blood - Madonna Statue. Chapel of Immaculate Conception. Mellieha, Malta, 27 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Madonna Statue. Chapel of Immaculate Conception. Mellieha, Malta, 27 August 2014

© Tony Blood - Chapel of Immaculate Conception. Mellieha, Malta, 27 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Madonna Statue. Chapel of Immaculate Conception. Mellieha, Malta, 27 August 2014

© Tony Blood - Chapel of Immaculate Conception. Mellieha, Malta, 27 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Chapel of Immaculate Conception. Mellieha, Malta, 27 August 2014

© Tony Blood - Chapel of Immaculate Conception. Mellieha, Malta, 27 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Chapel of Immaculate Conception. Mellieha, Malta, 27 August 2014

© Tony Blood - Chapel of Immaculate Conception. Mellieha, Malta, 27 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Chapel of Immaculate Conception. Mellieha, Malta, 27 August 2014

Memorial Plaque | Chapel of the Immaculate Conception | L-Aħrax, Melleiha, Malta | 27 August 2014

MARC BRADSHAW “Born on the 9th of September 1977 In everlasting memory of my dearest son who died tragically from these cliffs on the 5th of July 2000. Always remember his smile and his love and never forget him in your prayers. May God always keep you with him and grant you eternal rest.” Dad.

© Tony Blood - Marc Bradshaw Memorial. Chapel of Immaculate Conception. Mellieha, Malta, 27 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Marc Bradshaw Memorial. Chapel of Immaculate Conception. Mellieha, Malta, 27 August 2014

Slugs Bay | Mellieha, Malta | 27 August 2014

Slugs Bay is a secluded, tiny, pocket beach with a few square metres of sand  located in the Marfa ridge overlooking Mellieħa.

The bay can be reached over difficult terrain descending along a cliff slope. Access from the water is restricted due to rocks jutting from the sea. Consequently little or no development has taken place and the bay is largely in pristine condition. The bay took its name from the dark brown, sea-slug which can be found in its waters. The rare indigenous plant the pancratium maritimum is abundant in the area in August.

Information from:
Web: http://www.visitmalta.com/en/info/slugsbay

© Tony Blood - Slugs Bay. Mellieha, Malta, 27 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Slugs Bay. Mellieha, Malta, 27 August 2014