Tag Archives: Steps

McDonalds Buddha | Hamburg, Germany | 30 August, 2017

A homeless man sleeps on the steps of McDonald’s. An empty coffee cup is used to collect change from passers by.

© Tony Blood - McDonalds Buddha, Hamburg, Germany. 30 August, 2017

© Tony Blood – McDonalds Buddha, Hamburg, Germany. 30 August, 2017

The Citadel | Victoria, Gozo | 30 August 2014

The Citadel in Gozo owes its roots to the late medieval era, but the hill has been settled since Neolithic times. After the Great Siege of 1565, the Knights set about re-fortifying it to provide refuge and defence against further attack. Until 1637, the Gozitan population was required by law to spend their nights within the Citadel for their own safety. In later, more peaceful times, this restriction was lifted and people settled below its walls, creating the prosperous town of Rabat, now known as Victoria.

Information from:
Web: http://www.visitmalta.com/en/info/citadel

© Tony Blood - Canon. The Citadel, Victoria, Gozo, 30 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Canon. The Citadel, Victoria, Gozo, 30 August 2014

© Tony Blood - Crests. The Citadel, Victoria, Gozo, 30 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Crests. The Citadel, Victoria, Gozo, 30 August 2014

© Tony Blood - Steps. The Citadel, Victoria, Gozo, 30 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Steps. The Citadel, Victoria, Gozo, 30 August 2014

© Tony Blood - Canon. The Citadel, Victoria, Gozo, 30 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Canon. The Citadel, Victoria, Gozo, 30 August 2014

Fishermen | Il Blata Tal Melh, Rabat, Malta | 29 August 2014

"Yesterday I bought 50 Euros of squid. This, we use it for the bait. So we cut it into pieces like this and they float. But today it stays at the side of the rocks, not so far away. I had no luck, I caught nothing."  Geatano Micallef, Fisheman. Il Blata Tal Melh, Rabat, Malta. 29 August 2014.

“Yesterday I bought 50 Euros of squid. This, we use it for the bait. So we cut it into pieces like this and they float. But today it stays at the side of the rocks, not so far away. I had no luck, I caught nothing.”
Geatano Micallef, Fisheman. Il Blata Tal Melh, Rabat, Malta. 29 August 2014.

"You have to be careful where you walk here. When you get to the inlet you have to run and then jump across it but watch your head on the other side because there is a rock. Some rocks fell down years ago and now it's harder to get to the other side."  Fisherman. Il Blata Tal Melh, Rabat, Malta. 29 August 2014.

“You have to be careful where you walk here. When you get to the inlet you have to run and then jump across it but watch your head on the other side because there is a rock. Some rocks fell down years ago and now it’s harder to get to the other side.”
Fisherman. Il Blata Tal Melh, Rabat, Malta. 29 August 2014.

"I've been coming here for 10 years so climbing up is easy to me." Fisherman. Il Blata Tal Melh, Rabat, Malta. 29 August 2014.

“I’ve been coming here for 10 years so climbing up is easy to me.”
Fisherman. Il Blata Tal Melh, Rabat, Malta. 29 August 2014.

Salt Pans | Il Blata Tal Melh, Rabat, Malta | 26 August 2014

© Tony Blood - Salt Pans. Blata Tal Melh, Rabat, Malta, August 2014

© Tony Blood – Salt Pans. Blata Tal Melh, Rabat, Malta, 26 August 2014

© Tony Blood - Salt Pans. Blata Tal Melh, Rabat, Malta, August 2014

© Tony Blood – Salt Pans. Blata Tal Melh, Rabat, Malta, 26 August 2014

© Tony Blood - Hiker's Cave.  Il Blata Tal Melh, rabat, Malta, August 2014

© Tony Blood – Hiker’s Cave. Il Blata Tal Melh, Rabat, Malta, 26 August 2014

© Tony Blood - Hiker's Cave. Il Blata Tal Melh, Rabat, Malta, August 2014

© Tony Blood – Hiker’s Cave, Il Blata Tal Melh, Rabat, Malta, 26 August 2014

© Tony Blood - Salt Pans. Blata Tal Melh, Rabat, Malta, August 2014

© Tony Blood – Salt Pans. Blata Tal Melh, Rabat, Malta, 26 August 2014

© Tony Blood - Salt Pans. Bahrija, Blata Tal Melh, Rabat, Malta, August 2014

© Tony Blood – Salt Pans. Bahrija, Blata Tal Melh, Rabat, Malta, 26 August 2014

© Tony Blood - Salt Pans. Blata Tal Melh, Rabat, Malta, August 2014

© Tony Blood – Salt Pans. Blata Tal Melh, Rabat, Malta, 26 August 2014

© Tony Blood - Salt Pans. Blata Tal Melh, Rabat, Malta, 26 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Salt Pans. Blata Tal Melh, Rabat, Malta, 26 August 2014

© Tony Blood - Il Blata Tal Melh, Rabat, Malta, August 2014

© Tony Blood – Il Blata Tal Melh, Rabat, Malta, 26 August 2014

© Tony Blood - Inlet. Blata Tal Melh, Rabat, Malta, 26 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Inlet. Blata Tal Melh, Rabat, Malta, 26 August 2014

© Tony Blood - Staircase. Blata Tal Melh, Rabat, Malta, 26 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Staircase. Blata Tal Melh, Rabat, Malta, 26 August 2014

Senglea, Malta | 30 July 2014

This small city, one of the so-called Three Cities, stands on a narrow promontory jutting into Grand Harbour.

The land was fortified in 1551 by Grand Master Claude de la Sengle. The Maltese often use the area’s earlier name, L-Isla, meaning the island or perhaps short for `peninsula’. During the Great Siege of 1565, Senglea was protected by Fort St. Michael on its landward side and by Fort St. Angelo on the tip of Vittoriosa across the creek. The heroic role played by its people led Grand Master Jean de la Valette to give the city the title of Citta’ Invicta, the invincible city. Like its sister cities, Senglea suffered heavy damage during World War II. More than 75 percent of its buildings were destroyed. The parish church dedicated to the Nativity of the Madonna was rebuilt and retains its artistic heritage.

The city is noted for its superb harbour views across to Valletta from Safe Haven Gardens at Senglea Point. The stone vedette, known as Il-Gardjola, on the bastion-point served as a look-out post to guard the harbour entrance. The sculptured eye and ear above its windows are symbols of vigilance.

Information from:
Web: http://www.visitmalta.com/en/info/senglea

© Tony Blood - View of Birgu. Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood – View of Birgu. Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Senglea Harbour, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Senglea Harbour, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Steps. Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Steps. Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Triq il-Vitorja. Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Triq il-Vitorja. Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Door Knob. Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Door Knob. Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Point Sally Port, Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Point Sally Port, Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Point Sally Port, Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Point Sally Port, Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Senglea, Malta, 30 July 2014

Carmelite Church | Valletta, Malta | 22 July 2014

The sense of mystery inspired by the richly-painted dome interior at the Carmelite Church is deepened when one considers that no-one knows who actually designed it. Many attribute the French military engineer Mederico de Blondel des Croisettes, who built the Santa Maria di Gesù in Valletta. Nonetheless you are walking among secrets here in the first elliptically-designed Baroque church in Malta, where the Friars dutifully gather in turns for the Eucharist and the ‘Divine Office’.

With the building stripped of its precious silver and damask hangings during the French occupation of 1798-1799, Maltese rebels finally rose against their oppressors: the church was laid to siege while a young boy climbed the belfry to ring the bell as a call to arms, igniting Mdina’s revolt against French domination.

Information from:
Web: http://www.maltacultureguide.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=18

© Tony Blood - Carmelite Church. Valletta Malta, 22 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Carmelite Church. Valletta Malta, 22 July 2014

Bridge Bar | Valletta, Malta | 22 July 2014

The Bridge Bar is open every Friday during the summer. Customers can sit outside on cushions on the steps and listen to Live-Jazz music.

© Tony Blood - Bridge Bar. Valletta Malta, 22 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Bridge Bar. Valletta Malta, 22 July 2014

The Auberge de Castille | Valletta, Malta | 19 July 2014

The Auberge de Castille was the official seat of the knights of the Langue of Castille, León and Portugal – one of the most powerful of the Order of St. John, its Head being the Grand Chancellor. The Knights of this Langue were responsible for the defence of part of the fortifications of Valletta, known as the St Barbara Bastion. The Auberge is situated at the highest point of Valletta and originally looked out on the rolling countryside beyond, giving it a unique vantage-point unsurpassed by any other building in the city. The original Auberge was built by the renowned Maltese architect Girolamo Cassar in 1574. It was extensively re-modelled and virtually rebuilt in 1741, the present plan of the imposing structure attributed to Andrea Belli. The building was damaged during the siege of the French forces (1799–1800) as well as during the Second World War (1939–1945).

Information from:
Web: http://www.visitmalta.com/en/info/aubergedecastille

© Tony Blood - The Auberge de Castille. Valletta Malta, 19 July 2014

© Tony Blood – The Auberge de Castille. Valletta Malta, 19 July 2014

© Tony Blood - The Auberge de Castille. Valletta Malta, 19 July 2014

© Tony Blood – The Auberge de Castille. Valletta Malta, 19 July 2014

Sedef Island | Princes’ Islands | Turkey | 5 July 2014

Sedef Island, (Turkish: Sedef Adası, literally “Mother-of-Pearl Island”; Greek: Τερέβυνθος Terebinthos, and in ancient times also Androvitha or Andircuithos) is one of the nine islands consisting the Princes’ Islands in the Sea of Marmara, near Istanbul, Turkey. Sedef Adası is officially a neighbourhood in the Adalar district of Istanbul.

With an area of 0.157 km², it is one of the smallest islands of the archipelago. The island is mostly private property and the current pine forests were largely planted by its owner Şehsuvar Menemencioğlu, who purchased the island in 1956 and also played an important role in the imposition of a strict building code to make sure that the island’s nature and environment will be protected. It is not allowed to build houses with more than 2 floors.

The island’s Greek name, Terebinthos, means “turpentine”, which suggests a significant presence of the turpentine tree or terebinth in earlier times. In 857 AD Patriarch Ignatios of Constantinople was sent in exile to the island, where he was imprisoned for 10 years before being re-elected as Patriarch in 867 AD.

Information from:
Web: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sedef_Island

© Tony Blood - Sedef Island, Princes' Islands, Turkey. 5 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Sedef Island, Princes’ Islands, Turkey. 5 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Sedef Island, Princes' Islands, Turkey. 5 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Sedef Island, Princes’ Islands, Turkey. 5 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Sedef Island, Princes' Islands, Turkey. 5 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Sedef Island, Princes’ Islands, Turkey. 5 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Sedef Island, Princes' Islands, Turkey. 5 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Sedef Island, Princes’ Islands, Turkey. 5 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Sedef Island, Princes' Islands, Turkey. 5 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Sedef Island, Princes’ Islands, Turkey. 5 July 2014

© Tony Blood - Sedef Island, Princes' Islands, Turkey. 5 July 2014

© Tony Blood – Sedef Island, Princes’ Islands, Turkey. 5 July 2014

Traces | 2012 | Digital

The city can be seen as a confusing place often perplexing new visitors with its unexplored street corners and unfamiliar features. ‘City Traces’ investigates this notion visually. Photographed within the city of Birmingham, these images could be of any street in any city where trees merge with street furniture, buildings appear to move into place like a puzzle and figures walk through passageways leaving traces of themselves behind.

All images copyright ©2013 Tony Blood Photography

No copying without the photographer’s permission.

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