Tag Archives: Still Life

SALON | Group Exhibition | Waterhall Gallery, Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery | 13 Nov – 23 Dec (12 – 2pm)

2 of my Still Life pictures will be on display at the SALON Exhibition at Waterhall Gallery, Birmingham. If you are around Birmingham between 12 and 2pm, feel free to visit the show. The exhibition offers over 100 works of contemporary art for sale by 80 artists from the West Midlands and beyond between 13 November to 23 December 2015.  Works include paintings, prints, photography, sculpture, book and film.

Address:
Waterhall Gallery,
Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery,
Edmund Street,
Birmingham,
B3 3DH.

For more information:
http://newartwm.org/exhibition/salon-2015/

SALON Flyer

 

Exhibition Taster | Selfridges, Birmingham | 3rd October 2015

As part of the Live and Loud festival, one of my pictures will be on show at Selfridges, Birmingham on Saturday 3rd October on level 1 (1pm-7pm). The show is a taster for the SALON exhibition coming up in November this year.

For more information:
http://newartwm.org/event/salon-taster-at-selfridges-live-loud-3-october-2015/
http://www.selfridges.com/GB/en/content/article/live-loud-celebrating-best-birmingham

Selfridges Live and Loud

 

News | Black Country Echoes | Group Exhibition | Bessant Gallery Wolverhampton | 2014

In association with University of Wolverhampton,  Wolverhampton Art Gallery and Arts Council England there will be a group exhibition on 1st September to October 31st 2014 at The Bessant Gallery. The work was commissioned as part of the Black Country Echoes Festival which celebrates manufacturing traditions. To coincide with the exhibition and festival the groups of work will be on displayed on banners in Dudley Street, Wolverhampton.

The Bessant Gallery
School of Art & Design
University of Wolverhampton
Molineux Street
Wolverhampton
WV1 1DT

Further Information:
https://www.wlv.ac.uk/Default.aspx?page=40802
http://www.blackcountryechoes.org.uk/ai1ec_event/student-photography-exhibition/?instance_id=314

© Tony Blood - Broadfield House Glass Tools

© Tony Blood – Broadfield House Glass Tools

Body Armour | The Palace Armoury | Valletta, Malta | 18 September 2014

© Tony Blood - The Palace Armoury. Valletta, Malta, 18 September 2014

© Tony Blood – The Palace Armoury. Valletta, Malta, 18 September 2014

© Tony Blood - The Palace Armoury. Valletta, Malta, 18 September 2014

© Tony Blood – The Palace Armoury. Valletta, Malta, 18 September 2014

© Tony Blood - The Palace Armoury. Valletta, Malta, 18 September 2014

© Tony Blood – The Palace Armoury. Valletta, Malta, 18 September 2014

© Tony Blood - The Palace Armoury. Valletta, Malta, 18 September 2014

© Tony Blood – The Palace Armoury. Valletta, Malta, 18 September 2014

© Tony Blood - The Palace Armoury. Valletta, Malta, 18 September 2014

© Tony Blood – The Palace Armoury. Valletta, Malta, 18 September 2014

© Tony Blood - The Palace Armoury. Valletta, Malta, 18 September 2014

© Tony Blood – The Palace Armoury. Valletta, Malta, 18 September 2014

The Palace Armoury | Valletta, Malta | 18 September 2014

The Palace Armoury is one of the world’s largest collections of arms and armour that is still housed in its original building. The Knights of St John were a unique brotherhood of resolute warrior monks. From Malta, their island stronghold, these combatant aristocrats from the noblest houses of Europe, carried out their relentless crusade against the Ottoman Turks in defence of the Catholic faith. The Palace Armoury is certainly one of the most visible and tangible symbols of the past glories of the Sovereign Hospitaller Military Order of Malta.

Grand Master Alof de Wignacourt transferred the Order’s arsenal to the Magisterial Palace in 1604 where it was the pride of the Order. Apart from being lavishly adorned with elaborate trophies of arms, it held enough arms and armour to equip thousands of soldiers. It was housed in the magnificent hall at the rear of the building, right above its present location. At present, it is displayed inside two halls that were originally the stables of the palace.

Following the forced departure of the Order of St. John from Malta, the armoury somehow lost much of its original grandeur. However, it was restored and was officially opened as Malta’s first public museum in 1860. Although only a fraction of its original splendour remains, the Armoury still contains abundant material of Italian, German, French and Spanish origin from principal production centres. Also displayed is an exotic selection of Islamic and Ottoman arms and armour. Apart from the massed arms of the common soldiers in the collection, the enriched personal armours of the nobility still manage to make a statement.

Information from:
Web: http://heritagemalta.org/museums-sites/the-palace-armoury/

© Tony Blood - The Palace Armoury. Valletta, Malta, 18 September 2014

© Tony Blood – The Palace Armoury. Valletta, Malta, 18 September 2014

The National Museum of Archaeology | Valletta, Malta | 25 August 2014

The National Museum of Archaeology displays a significant array of artefacts from the Islands’ unique prehistoric periods, starting with the first arrival of man in 5200 BC, running up to 2500 BC. The first rooms trace man’s early settlement on the Islands up to the temple-building periods using a reconstruction of a rock-cut tomb. The collection includes obsidian cores and the Red Skorba figurines, which are predecessors of the temple period objects and statuary. The main hall is devoted to temple carvings and the collection continues with representations of animals, temple models, and the remarkable human figures. Of particular note are the exquisite figures of the ‘Sleeping Lady’ from the Hypogeum, and the ‘Venus’ of Hagar Qim. The last room exhibits some pottery from the temple period, together with tools, beads and other ornaments.

Information from:
Web: http://www.visitmalta.com/en/info/nationalmuseumofarchaeology

The National Museum of Archaeology is housed in the Auberge de Provence, in Republic Street, Valletta. The building, an example of fine Baroque architecture, was built in 1571 and followed a plan by local architect Ġilormu Cassar. The Auberge de Provence was house to the Knights of the Order of St John originating from Provence, France and displays beautiful architectural features. Of particular note is the Grand Salon, with its richly painted walls and wooden beamed ceiling. The Museum exhibits a spectacular range of artefacts dating back to Malta’s Neolithic period (5000 BC) up to the Phoenician Period (400 BC). On display are the earliest tools used by the prehistoric people to facilitate their daily tasks and representations of animal and human figures; elements which not only show the great artistic skills of the first dwellers of the island but also gives us an insight of their daily lives.

Highlights include the ‘Sleeping Lady’ from the Ħal Saflieni Hypogeum, the ‘Venus of Malta’ from Ħaġar Qim, bronze daggers recovered from the Bronze Age layers at Tarxien Temples, and the Horus and Anubis pendant and the anthropomorphic sarcophagus, both belonging to the Phoenician Period. The Museum provides the visitor with a good introduction to the prehistory and early history of the Maltese Island sand acts as a catalyst to the other archaeological sites in Malta. Works are currently in progress to include another hall dedicated to the Punic period and others dedicated to the Roman and Byzantine periods in Malta.

Information from:
Web: http://heritagemalta.org/museums-sites/national-museum-of-archaeology/

© Tony Blood - The National Museum of Archaeology. Valletta Malta, 25 August 2014

© Tony Blood – The National Museum of Archaeology. Valletta Malta, 25 August 2014

© Tony Blood - Jug with floral decoration from Tal-Liedna (Terracotta). The National Museum of Archaeology. Valletta Malta, 25 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Jug with floral decoration from Tal-Liedna (Terracotta). The National Museum of Archaeology. Valletta Malta, 25 August 2014

The Phoenicians buried their dead in a variety of ways. One of these was to put the corpse inside a coffin. Fashioned in wood, terracotta stone, stone, and marble, coffins consisted of a casket and a lid, and were often shaped like a human figure, a practice that was very popular in pharaonic Egypt. The coffin on display here was found at Għar Barka on the outskirts of Rabat (Malta) in 1797. Lead poured inside the grooves on the side of the coffin was meant to hold the lid firmly in place. In the Phoenician homeland, members of the royal family were buried in similar coffins, often re-using ones brought over from Egypt. They would have inscriptions written on the lids to curse anyone who disturbed their eternal sleep. © Tony Blood - Phoenician Coffin. The National Museum of Archaeology. Valletta Malta, 25 August 2014

The Phoenicians buried their dead in a variety of ways. One of these was to put the corpse inside a coffin. Fashioned in wood, terracotta stone, stone, and marble, coffins consisted of a casket and a lid, and were often shaped like a human figure, a practice that was very popular in pharaonic Egypt. The coffin on display here was found at Għar Barka on the outskirts of Rabat (Malta) in 1797. Lead poured inside the grooves on the side of the coffin was meant to hold the lid firmly in place. In the Phoenician homeland, members of the royal family were buried in similar coffins, often re-using ones brought over from Egypt. They would have inscriptions written on the lids to curse anyone who disturbed their eternal sleep.
© Tony Blood – Phoenician Coffin. The National Museum of Archaeology. Valletta Malta, 25 August 2014

© Tony Blood - Silver plate with commemorative dedication to Sir Alexander Ball (1757-1809) (Silver). The National Museum of Archaeology. Valletta Malta, 25 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Silver plate with commemorative dedication to Sir Alexander Ball (1757-1809) (Silver). The National Museum of Archaeology. Valletta Malta, 25 August 2014

© Tony Blood - Bronze Dagger from Għar Mirdum (Bronze and Bone). The National Museum of Archaeology. Valletta Malta, 25 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Bronze Dagger from Għar Mirdum (Bronze and Bone). The National Museum of Archaeology. Valletta Malta, 25 August 2014

© Tony Blood - Sir Temi Zammit's notebook no. 11. The National Museum of Archaeology. Valletta Malta, 25 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Sir Temi Zammit’s notebook no. 11. The National Museum of Archaeology. Valletta Malta, 25 August 2014

© Tony Blood - Human Skull from the Ħal Saflieni Hypogeum. The National Museum of Archaeology. Valletta Malta, 25 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Human Skull from the Ħal Saflieni Hypogeum. The National Museum of Archaeology. Valletta Malta, 25 August 2014

© Tony Blood - Sleeping Lady from the Ħal Saflieni Hypogeum. The National Museum of Archaeology. Valletta Malta, 25 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Sleeping Lady from the Ħal Saflieni Hypogeum. The National Museum of Archaeology. Valletta Malta, 25 August 2014

© Tony Blood - Venus of Malta. The National Museum of Archaeology. Valletta Malta, 25 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Venus of Malta. The National Museum of Archaeology. Valletta Malta, 25 August 2014

Fish Market | Marsaxlokk, Malta | 17 August 2014

The Marsaxlokk fish market is a very popular attraction featuring in many guide books and therefore attracts many tourists and locals who go to buy fresh fish and seafood caught during the same morning.

The market is very interesting and attractive as different fish and seafood from the Mediterranean are displayed here and prices are cheaper than in the shops. This is also a great way for children to see how the fish look, and some of fish and octopus are still alive.

Although the Marsaxlokk Sunday Market was originally a fish market, it has developed, and now it also sells locally produced honey, fruit jams, wine as well as vegetables, souvenirs and clothes. After shopping at the market, you can have lunch in one of the many seafood restaurants scattered in the picturesque bay of Marsaxlokk. If you are looking for other local produce and fresh vegetables visit the farmers market in Ta’ Qali.

Information from:
Web: http://www.malta.com/en/dining/market/marsaxlokk-fish-market

© Tony Blood - Fish Market. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 17 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Fish Market. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 17 August 2014

© Tony Blood - Fish Market. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 17 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Fish Market. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 17 August 2014

© Tony Blood - Fish Market. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 17 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Fish Market. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 17 August 2014

© Tony Blood - Fish Market. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 17 August 2014

© Tony Blood – Fish Market. Marsaxlokk, Malta, 17 August 2014

Group Exhibition | Library of Birmingham | 2014

 

I have a piece work currently exhibiting at the Library of Birmingham on ‘The Photographer’s Wall’.

The exhibition will run from 23rd January – 18th April 2014. It is free to visit and open Monday to Friday 8am – 8pm, Saturday 9am – 5pm, Sunday 11am – 4pm.

Reference:

Library of Birmingham launches The Photographers’ Wall | Creative Times. 2014.  [ONLINE] Available at: http://www.creativetimes.co.uk/news/library-of-birmingham-launches-the-photographers-wall. [Accessed 25 January 2014].

Photographer's Wall, Birmingham

Photographer’s Wall, Birmingham

No copying without the photographer’s permission.

All images copyright ©2010-2014 Tony Blood Photography All Rights Reserved.

The Photographer’s Wall | Library of Birmingham | 2014

Library of Birmingham launches The Photographers’ Wall

A new public space launches this week at the Library of Birmingham dedicated to photography and photographers from across the region.

The Photographers’ Wall is an open space located above the library’s café. Featuring some of the best photography made in the region, the wall aims to break down the barriers which galleries often face, taking photography directly to visitors of Europe’s largest Library and interacting with an audience who may not normally explore photography.

Launching on Thursday 23rd January, the first exhibition features a range of individual works drawn from larger projects made by artists who hail from or are now based in Birmingham and the West Midlands. It also includes images from the nationally designated and internationally significant Library of Birmingham Photography Collection.

The opening exhibition includes the works of 23 photographers including Brian Griffin, Dean O’Brien, Andrew Jackson, John Myers, Lily Wales, Mahtab Hussain and Sonia Audhali.

The exhibition will highlight the wealth of creative talent, the wide variety of photography practices and the diverse range of projects made, or in the process of being made by emerging and established artists in the region.

Pete James, Curator of Photography at Library of Birmingham, said: “The diverse range of images on show in the exhibition reveal just part of the enormous breadth of photographic talent based in the region. It encompasses work made in response or influenced by Renaissance painting all the way though to modernist photo-montage and others which represent the best of contemporary documentary and fine art practices. In the exhibition the work of established photographers sits alongside that or emergent artists confirming that Birmingham and the West Midlands has a long tradition as a centre of photographic excellence. It is the Library of Birmingham and GRAIN’s objective to bring wider attention and recognition to this important part of the region’s cultural profile.”

The Photographers’ Wall is a partnership project developed by the GRAIN Photography Hub and the Library of Birmingham, supported by Arts Council England.

The first exhibition will run from 23rd January – 18th April 2014. It is free to visit and open Monday to Friday 8am – 8pm, Saturday 9am – 5pm, Sunday 11am – 4pm.

Reference:

Library of Birmingham launches The Photographers’ Wall | Creative Times. 2014.  [ONLINE] Available at: http://www.creativetimes.co.uk/news/library-of-birmingham-launches-the-photographers-wall. [Accessed 25 January 2014].

For further information:

http://www.creativetimes.co.uk/news/library-of-birmingham-launches-the-photographers-wall

http://www.edgemagazine.org/library-birmingham-launches-photographers-wall.html

http://www.libraryofbirmingham.com/blog/News/photographerswall

http://grainphotographyhub.co.uk/events/the-photographers-wall-a-collection/

Pheasant

Pheasant

No copying without the photographer’s permission.
All images copyright ©2010-2014 Tony Blood Photography All Rights Reserved.

Transition | 2013 | Film

These are my final 7 images for the series.

Transition – The process or a period of changing from one state or condition to another.

The  work addresses the idea of remembrance, loss, memory, recollection, transition and death through the notion of the object. These objects were originally photographed at a relative’s home after she passed away. The images combine the Still Life with the Portrait whereby each relative of the deceased is seated alongside the ornaments and objects they inherited.

Comments about my work are very much appreciated.

All images copyright ©2013 Tony Blood Photography

No copying without the photographer’s permission.

Transition #1

Transition #1

Transition #2

Transition #2

Transition #3

Transition #3

Transition #4

Transition #4

Transition #5

Transition #5

Transition #6

Transition #6

Transition #7

Transition #7

Work in Progress| Transition | 2013 | Film

More images from the current work ‘Transition’. I am in the process of editing and selecting the final 7 images for the series.

Comments about my work are very much appreciated.

All images copyright ©2013 Tony Blood Photography

No copying without the photographer’s permission.

Transition | Shoot 4 #1

Transition | Shoot 4 #1

Transition | Shoot 4 #3

Transition | Shoot 4 #3

Transition | Shoot 4 #5

Transition | Shoot 4 #5

Transition | Shoot 8 #10

Transition | Shoot 8 #10

Transition | Shoot 6 #11

Transition | Shoot 6 #11

Transition | Shoot 6 #8

Transition | Shoot 6 #8

Transition | Shoot 2 #12

Transition | Shoot 2 #12

Transition | Shoot 2 #10

Transition | Shoot 2 #10

Work in Progress | Transition | 2013 | Film

Transition – The process or a period of changing from one state or condition to another.

The current work in progress addresses the idea of remembrance, loss, memory, recollection, transition and death through the notion of the object. These objects were originally photographed at a relative’s home after she passed away. It is a continuation of work which began in the Evanesce series. The difference with these images is that they combine the Still Life and the Portrait whereby each relative of the deceased is seated alongside the ornaments and objects they inherited. [More images to follow]

Comments about my work are very much appreciated.

All images copyright ©2013 Tony Blood Photography

No copying without the photographer’s permission.

Transition | Shoot 3 #7

Transition | Shoot 3 #7

Transition | Shoot 3 #1

Transition | Shoot 3 #1

Transition | Shoot 3 #12

Transition | Shoot 3 #12