Tag Archives: War

Fort Campbell | Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta | 30 September 2014

Fort Campbell was built in 1937 and was armed with two guns to defend the coastal waters of Mellieha and St. Paul’s Bay against invasion. Another anti aircraft gun was added later. One can still see the gun emplacements, the soldier’s quarters, the underground magazine and the Fire Control Command. Several pillboxes and machine gun openings were constructed all around the fort. The fort was garrisoned by 200 RMA soldiers. It’s generator fed the Search Lights facing St. Paul’s islands. This fort was abandoned around 1970.

Information from:
Rural Development Programme for Malta 2007-2013
The European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development
Europe Investing in Rural Areas

© Tony Blood - Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood - Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood - Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood - Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood - Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood - Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood - Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood - Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood - Fire Station, Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Fire Station, Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood - Fire Station, Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

© Tony Blood – Fire Station, Fort Campbell. Selmun, Mellieħa, Malta, 30 September 2014

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Body Armour | The Palace Armoury | Valletta, Malta | 18 September 2014

© Tony Blood - The Palace Armoury. Valletta, Malta, 18 September 2014

© Tony Blood – The Palace Armoury. Valletta, Malta, 18 September 2014

© Tony Blood - The Palace Armoury. Valletta, Malta, 18 September 2014

© Tony Blood – The Palace Armoury. Valletta, Malta, 18 September 2014

© Tony Blood - The Palace Armoury. Valletta, Malta, 18 September 2014

© Tony Blood – The Palace Armoury. Valletta, Malta, 18 September 2014

© Tony Blood - The Palace Armoury. Valletta, Malta, 18 September 2014

© Tony Blood – The Palace Armoury. Valletta, Malta, 18 September 2014

© Tony Blood - The Palace Armoury. Valletta, Malta, 18 September 2014

© Tony Blood – The Palace Armoury. Valletta, Malta, 18 September 2014

© Tony Blood - The Palace Armoury. Valletta, Malta, 18 September 2014

© Tony Blood – The Palace Armoury. Valletta, Malta, 18 September 2014

The Palace Armoury | Valletta, Malta | 18 September 2014

The Palace Armoury is one of the world’s largest collections of arms and armour that is still housed in its original building. The Knights of St John were a unique brotherhood of resolute warrior monks. From Malta, their island stronghold, these combatant aristocrats from the noblest houses of Europe, carried out their relentless crusade against the Ottoman Turks in defence of the Catholic faith. The Palace Armoury is certainly one of the most visible and tangible symbols of the past glories of the Sovereign Hospitaller Military Order of Malta.

Grand Master Alof de Wignacourt transferred the Order’s arsenal to the Magisterial Palace in 1604 where it was the pride of the Order. Apart from being lavishly adorned with elaborate trophies of arms, it held enough arms and armour to equip thousands of soldiers. It was housed in the magnificent hall at the rear of the building, right above its present location. At present, it is displayed inside two halls that were originally the stables of the palace.

Following the forced departure of the Order of St. John from Malta, the armoury somehow lost much of its original grandeur. However, it was restored and was officially opened as Malta’s first public museum in 1860. Although only a fraction of its original splendour remains, the Armoury still contains abundant material of Italian, German, French and Spanish origin from principal production centres. Also displayed is an exotic selection of Islamic and Ottoman arms and armour. Apart from the massed arms of the common soldiers in the collection, the enriched personal armours of the nobility still manage to make a statement.

Information from:
Web: http://heritagemalta.org/museums-sites/the-palace-armoury/

© Tony Blood - The Palace Armoury. Valletta, Malta, 18 September 2014

© Tony Blood – The Palace Armoury. Valletta, Malta, 18 September 2014

WWII Shelters | Wignacourt Museum | Rabat, Malta | 24 July 2014

The building, fully completed in 1749, is on three levels: the underground level consists of a labyrinth of Punic, Roman and Christian Hypogea with interesting architectural features as well as a complex of World War II shelters with two main corridors and fifty rooms.

Information from:
Web: http://www.wignacourtmuseum.com

© Tony Blood – WWII Shelters, Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – WWII Shelters, Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – WWII Shelters, Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – WWII Shelters, Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – WWII Shelters, Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – WWII Shelters, Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – WWII Shelters, Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

© Tony Blood – WWII Shelters, Wignacourt Museum, Rabat, Malta 24 July 2014

Forces | 2013 | Digital

The current work is a series of intimate portraits based on people who have trained in the Armed Forces. This role requires skill, mental and physical effort and above all discipline. Choosing a career in the forces with the intention to engage in combat is also a great sacrifice. They do this in order to bring peace, it shows spirit, courage and determination, and it was my aim to depict these mindsets within the series.

Paul - 31.369761,63.958969

Paul – 31.369761,63.958969

Stuart - 54.59171,-5.963902

Stuart – 54.59171,-5.963902

John - 12.80022,45.033345

John – 12.80022,45.033345

Ian - 17.935089,31.080016

Ian – 17.935089,31.080016

Andrew - 17.735607,-89.008484

Andrew – 17.735607,-89.008484

Comments about my work are very much appreciated.

All images copyright ©2014 Tony Blood Photography

No copying without the photographer’s permission.